LOEWE Craft Prize 2017

logoIn 2016, the LOEWE FOUNDATION launches the LOEWE Craft Prize, an annual international award celebrating excellence in craftsmanship. With this forward-looking initiative, LOEWE seeks to recognise uniquely talented artisans whose artistic vision and will to innovate will set a new standard for the future of craft.
http://loewecraftprize.com/#_home


Key Dates~

• 12 April 2016: Entry site opens to submit work            • Apr. 2017: Winner announced
• 7 Nov. 2016: Submissions close                                    • May 2017: Exhibition of finalist and winning works in
• Feb. 2017: Shortlist of finalists announced                      Madrid

Hardie Gramatky: Born on April 12, 1907

Bernhard August “Hardie” Gramatky, Jr. (April 12, 1907-April 29, 1979) was an American painter, author, and illustrator. He wrote and illustrated several children’s books, most notably “Little Toot”.

ROOFHardie Gramatky was born in Dallas, TX, in 1907 but moved to California as a small boy after his father died of tuberculosis. He attended Stanford University (earning the tuition by working as a logger and a bank teller) and Chouinard Art Institute before becoming one of Disney’s early animators in 1929. In the 1920s and `30s, he helped start the California Watercolor movement. In 1936, after a 6-year Disney contract expired, he left the company (earning $150 a week, a huge sum in the Depression) to move to New York City with his wife, artist Dorothea Cooke, to become illustrators. It was there, in his studio on Pearl Street, that Gramatky saw a Moran tugboat out his window that obviously didn’t want to work and kept making figure 8s on the East River. So in 1939 after painting many watercolors of the busy harbor, GramatkypicGramatky wondered what would happen if a “tug didn’t want to tug” and wrote the story. The book got immediate attention and has been a favorite picture book ever since, and Gramatky’s fine art watercolors and giclée prints continue to be prized. He died of cancer of the ileum in Westport, Connecticut, on April 29, 1979.
http://www.penguin.com/author/hardie-gramatky/234447

http://www.californiawatercolor.com/pages/hardie-gramatky-biography

Lily Pons: Born on April 12, 1898

Few opera stars have led such an impressive career. For over a quarter of a century, her coloratura voice captured the stages of Paris, London, Buenos Aires, Mexico, and the United States. Like Mario Lanza and Luciano Pavarotti, she acted in second-rate films about opera stars, which were surprisingly well-attended. As a child, I recall her appearances on variety shows and heard her on the radio at least once a month. Today, there is a Lilypons, Maryland (and its main street, Lily Pons Rd.). Even a contemporary rock group has named itself after her. She was the Three Tenors of her day.

Her sweet soprano voice had an extremely high tessitura. It was said she could hold a high D for about a minute. The Metropolitan Opera revived roles especially for her, like Delibes’ Lakmé, Donizetti’s La Fille du Regiment, and Rimsky-Korsakov’s Le Coq d’or.
http://www.classical.net/music/recs/reviews/s/sny60655a.php

In addition to her fabulous voice, Pons had another distinction — having a Maryland post office named for her. In 1932, the tiny Frederick County post office of Lilypons opened for business. “It was a dot on a map, because nobody has ever been quite sure what to call it. Lilypons, Md., was never a city, town or even a hamlet,” said The Evening Sun in 1986. “It is now what it has always been: one frame building surrounded by a small cluster of ponds nestled into a bdaycakepeaceful crook of the Monocacy River eight miles south of Frederick. Its only inhabitants have been rare goldfish and beautiful blooming waterlilies.” In 1963, during a period of cost cutting, the Postal Service discontinued the Lilypons postmark and combined its functions with the nearby Buckeystown post office. A plaque commemorating the tiny post office was mounted on the building in 1986.
http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1997-10-05/features/1997278029_1_lily-pons-lilypons-frederick-county