Charles Rennie Mackintosh~ Born June 7, 1868

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (7 June 1868-10 December 1928) was
a Scottish architect, designer, water colourist and artist. He was a designer in the Post-Impressionist movement and also the main representative of Art Nouveau in the United Kingdom. He had considerable influence on European design. He was born in Glasgow…

https://alchetron.com/Charles-Rennie-Mackintosh-1221200-W

Mackintosh was apprenticed to a local architect John Hutchison, but in 1889 he transferred to the larger, more established city practice of Honeyman and Keppie.

To complement his architectural apprenticeship, Mackintosh enrolled for evening classes at the Glasgow School of Art where he pursued various drawing programmes.
https://www.crmsociety.com/about-mackintosh/charles-rennie-mackintosh/

In the 1890s he was part of ‘The Four’ – an informal grouping with the English sisters Margaret and Frances Macdonald and James Herbert McNair – that produced some of the most inventive decorative art and graphic design of the period. His major achievements include his masterpiece  The Glasgow School of Art, the villas Windyhill and The Hill House, Scotland Street School, and a series of city-centre tea room interiors. In common with many of his contemporaries he believed that the architect was responsible not just for the fabric of a building, but for every detail of its interior design. http://www.glasgowmackintosh.com/mackintosh

Despite this success and with his undoubted influence abroad, Mackintosh’s work met with considerable indifference at home and his career in Glasgow declined. Few private clients were sufficiently sympathetic to want his ‘total design’ of house and interior and he was incapable of compromise.

In 1923 the Mackintoshes left London for the South of France where Mackintosh gave up all thoughts of architecture and design and devoted himself entirely to painting landscapes. He died in London, of cancer, on 10 December 1928.
http://www.gsa.ac.uk/visit-gsa/mackintosh-building-tours/charles-rennie-mackintosh/

Design Museum~ https://designmuseum.org/designers/charles-rennie-mackintosh#toggle-submenu
Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society~ https://www.crmsociety.com/

George Szell: Born June 7, 1897

1978 SPECIAL CITATION for distinguished service to the arts (Posthumous)~
http://clevelandartsprize.org/awardees/george_szell.html
NAXOS: George Szell~ http://www.naxos.com/person/George_Szell_38224/38224.htm

“Szell stories”—tales of his irascibility, hauteur and genius—are still popular when musicians gather to drink and dish after concerts. Pianist Glenn Gould referred to Szell’s “Dr. Cyclops” reputation and nearly walked out of his one and only collaboration with the conductor. (“That nut’s a genius” was Szell’s personal appraisal of Gould.) In 1946, his first year as music director of the Cleveland Orchestra, Szell fired 22 of the 94 musicians in the group, and he later dismissed his brilliant principal oboist of almost two decades for a single insubordinate comment at a rehearsal. Most of his players were terrified of him; some frankly despised him. After Szell’s death, one Cleveland violinist refused to cut his hair, letting it grow down to his waist in posthumous rebuke to the martinet who could no longer object.

And yet Szell’s accomplishments in Cleveland cannot be overstated. He summed up his approach succinctly three years before his death. “My aim in developing the Cleveland Orchestra has been to combine the finest virtues of the great European orchestras of pre-World War II times with the most distinguished qualities of our leading American orchestras,” Szell wrote. “We put the American orchestra’s technical perfection, beauty of sound, and adaptability to the styles of various national schools of composers into the service of warmhearted, spontaneous music-making in the best European tradition.” And indeed, such was his legacy.
http://www.gramilano.com/2011/07/conductor-george-szell-was-his-own-worst-enemy-not-while-rudolf-bing-was-alive/

Marion Post Wolcott: Born June 7, 1910

Wolcott

manwithstogieMarion Post Wolcott is best known for the more than 9,000 photographs she produced for the Farm Security Administration (FSA) from 1938 to 1942.1 This work is preserved at the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division and also available online. Before Wolcott became a government photographer, she earned her living making photographs for magazines and newspapers. Initially she worked freelance, but, as a staff photojournalist in 1937 and 1938, Wolcott broke gendertrain barriers in the newspaper darkroom. Then she worked for the Farm Security Administration, one of the largest news photography projects in the world. She covered thousands of miles of the United States with her camera to document and publicize the need for federal assistance to those hardest hit by the Great Depression and agricultural blight.

Drawing on her social concerns and her artistic vision to illustrate issues that needed studentsredress, Wolcott produced an extraordinary number of images and her occupation challenged many social morés about the propriety of young women living away from the family home and traveling on their own. Although she worked professionally for only a few years, her artistry and perseverance have inspired many articles, books, and exhibitions and her photographs created a lasting record of American life on the eve of World War II.
http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/coll/womphotoj/wolcottessay.html

The Photography of Marion Post Wolcott~ http://people.virginia.edu/~ds8s/mpw/mpw-top.html#COM
Oral history interview with Marion Post Wolcott, 1965~ http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-history-interview-marion-post-wolcott-12262
Shorpy: M.P. Wolcott~ http://www.shorpy.com/image/tid/142