May 29, 1913: Premiere of “Le sacre du printemps”

The riot turned the work into a symbol of all that modernist art was supposed to be: a break with tradition and a thumb in the eye of bourgeois taste. Yet for quite some time scholars have called into question the size, the ferocity, and the immediate effects of what definitely was a disturbance on opening night. Did old women hit bohemians with their parasols? Perhaps. Did Stravinsky leave his seat in the theater out of fear? Perhaps, but only to watch backstage. And he did manage to appear for four or five curtain calls at the evening’s end—a detail not often marked in accounts of the riot?… Did the police come at all?  It is unclear.

But the extent to which this disturbance counts as a riot really is beside the point, as is the question of what actually happened that night. What matters most is that whatever it was, it never happened again. Spring Fever~ http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2013/07/11/spring-fever/

A Reconstruction Of ‘The Rite Of Spring”, 2013~  http://artery.wbur.org/2013/03/15/rite-of-spring
Biographical background~ http://www.cco.caltech.edu/~tan/Stravinsky/biography.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s