Marcia Brown: Born July 13, 1918

MBrown

CinderellaIn 1946, Brown published her first book The Little Carousel, which chronicles the adventures of a lonely little boy who hears the sound of a merry-go-round near his home and features Brown’s vivid description of a bustling neighborhood in Greenwich Village, where she lived upon first arriving in New York City. The Little Carousel, which she wrote and illustrated, was followed by over thirty more books during her career.  https://library.albany.edu/speccoll/marciabrown/bio.htm Brown’s first award was Caldecott Honors for Stone Soup (1948), an old folktale Brown retold and illustrated. SheMouse won the Caldecott Medal three times, and received Caldecott Honors a total of six times. She also received the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award, for  Once a Mouse… (1961), and her book  How, Hippo! (1969), the story of a baby hippo and a crocodile, was an American Library Association ShadowNotable Book.   Brown illustrated more than thirty books, most of which she either wrote or adapted. She loves folklore and illustrated a number of classic tales from around the world, including Puss in Boots (1952),  Anasi, the Spider Man (1954), and  The Flying Carpet (1956). Throughout her career, Brown used a wide variety of media, although her most distinctive illustrations are her colored woodblocks. In 1986, Brown published  Lotus Seeds: Children, Pictures, and Books, a compilation of her essays and speeches, and her only book for adults.  http://tinyurl.com/nbq2fpr

Obituary, New York Times~
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/07/books/marcia-brown-picture-book-illustrator-dies-at-96.html

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