The World’s First Cartoon: Fantasmagorie (1908)

  • On the 17th of August 1908, Fantasmagorie, the first fully animated feature film was released in Paris by the Gaumont company. Created by Emile Cohl, Fantasmagorie is considered one of the masterpieces of animated cinema and of early cinema as a whole. Done in a white-on-black style, reminiscent of a film negative, the film broke with the realist tradition emerging in live action at the time. It was much more stylized and fantastic, in some ways anticipating the surrealist movement of later decades.
    https://artlark.org/2016/08/17/fantasmagorie-the-first-ever-cartoon/

August 9, 1945: “Fat Man” is dropped over Nagasaki

In pictures: Nagasaki bombing~ http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-33769566
What Nagasaki looked like before and after the bomb~ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/08/09/what-nagasaki-looked-like-before-and-after-the-bomb/?tid=pm_world_pop_b

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Nagasaki Official Visitor Guide: Peace Park~ http://visit-nagasaki.com/spots/detail/209
The Art of Peace, Nagasaki~ http://nuclearfutures.org/the-art-of-peace-nagasaki/

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August 6, 1945: Enola Gay drops 5-ton bomb over Hiroshima

Composed in 1953 (eight years after the city’s bombing, and coinciding with the end of the American occupation of Japan), its six inner movements were inspired by six paintings by Iri and Toshi Maruki (the score’s original title was The Hiroshima Panels ), framed by a Prelude and Elegy.   http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Name/Masao-Ohki/Composer/148971-1

MARUKI GALLERY FOR THE HIROSHIMA PANELS

Paintings bring Japan’s hellish aftermath into vivid focus

Against Forgetting: Three Generations of Artists in Japan in Dialogue about the Legacies of World War II

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum WesSite~ http://hpmmuseum.jp/?lang=eng

Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

The modern world was born on a printing press. Once essential to communication, the 500-year-old process is now in danger of being lost as its caretakers age. From self-proclaimed basement hoarders to the famed Hatch Show Print, Pressing On: The Letterpress Film explores the question: why has letterpress survived in a digital age?

Worlds of each character emerge as unusual narratives—joyful, mournful, reflective and visionary—are punctuated with on-screen visual poetry, every shot meticulously composed. Captivating personalities blend with wood, metal and type as young printers strive to save this historic process in a film created for the designer, type nerd, historian and collector in us all.

 

via Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

http://www.printmag.com/design-inspiration/the-letterpress-journals-guardians-of-the-craft/

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html

Apollo 11 Image Gallery~ http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/apollo.html
Photos from December 1969 issue of National Geographic~
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/1969/12/moon-landing/moon-photography

The Moon in paintings and art~ http://www.popastro.com/moonwatch/moon_guide/art3.php
Moon in Painting~ http://www.artistsandart.org/2009/07/moon-in-painting.html
Moon Paintings of China and Japan~ https://owlcation.com/humanities/moon-paintings

July 14, 1916~ The Dada Manifesto

Richard Boix. Da-da (New York Dada Group). 1921. Ink on paper. 11 1/4″ x 14 1/2″ (28.6 x 36.8 cm)
Museum of Modern Art / Katherine S. Dreier Bequest

On July 14, 1916, the poet Hugo Ball proclaimed the manifesto for a new movement. Its name: Dada. Its aim: to “get rid of everything that smacks of journalism, worms, everything nice and right, blinkered, moralistic, europeanised, enervated.” This aim could be achieved simply by saying: “Dada.”

Dada~ Born February 5, 1916            100th anniversary of DADA~

  Max Ernst. Murdering Airplane. 1920. Collage. 2 1/2” x 5 1/2” (6.35 cm × 13.97 cm). Private collection.