Cecil B. DeMille: Born August 12, 1881

“If 1,000 years from now, archaeologists happen to dig beneath the sands of Guadalupe, I hope they will not rush into print with the amazing news that Egyptian civilization, far from being confined to the valley of the Nile, extended all the way to the Pacific coast of North America.”  ~”The Autobiography of Cecil B. DeMille,” 1959

So why did DeMille choose to bulldoze his set, rather than truck it back to Los Angeles?
“I think there were two things were going on,” Brosnan said, starting with DeMille’s pledge to leave the site as he’d found it. “Hauling away all that statuary would have been very expensive … so I think he pulled a fast one and buried it.”
In addition, he said, “(DeMille) knew that if he left it standing … the very next day somebody would be there filming a quickie on his set and they’d be on the streets with it in a few weeks. He was protecting his patent by taking it down.”
http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/santa-barbara/cecil-b-demill-ten-commandments-excavation-nipomo-dunes.html

California Historical Society: Stills from “The Ten Commandments” 1923
Lost City of DeMille is a 1923 Film Set Buried in the Dunes
Cecil B. Demille’s biography

Max Fleischer: Born July 19, 1883

In 1900 Max began to work as an errand boy at the Brooklyn Daily Eagle. By 1904 he was a staff artist.MF2 In 1905 he married his childhood sweetheart, Essie Gold; they had two children. After he left the Eagle, Max briefly did artwork for two companies and then became art editor of Popular Science Monthly in 1914. There his childhood interest in mechanical matters was reignited.

In fact, it was a mechanical problem that pulled Max Fleischer into the field of animation. Early animation was frequently very choppy. Max theorized that if live-action footage were traced, frame by frame, fluid motion could be achieved. He enlisted the help of his brothers Dave and Joe, and the three developed the Rotoscope, a camera mounted under a piece of frosted glass with a crank to advance the film, so each frame could be traced.

MF1It took the brothers a week to build the Rotoscope, but it was a full year before they finished their first cartoon. Dave donned a clown suit, and Max and Joe filmed him. Then they traced the clown on the Rotoscope. Work on the cartoon was completed in 1916, and a patent for the Rotoscope came through a year later.
http://anb.org/articles/20/20-01567.html

The Fleischers put popular, modern music at the center of many of their films, building entire cartoons around jazz legends such as Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong and Don Redman. These cartoons often featured the Fleischers’ signature MF3combination of live action and animation; in fact the earliest known footage of Cab Calloway in performance can be seen in the Fleischer classic Minnie the Moocher.

In 1929 the Studio made a major agreement with Paramount that would allow Paramount to distribute all Fleischer films. That same year the Studio changed its name to ‘Fleischer Studios.’
http://www.fleischerstudios.com/history.html


OUT OF THE INKWELL compilation~  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERprYNMQPhM
Max Fleischer NEWS SKETCHES compilation~ https://archive.org/details/max_fleischer_news_sketches
Lambiek Comiclopedia~  https://www.lambiek.net/artists/f/fleischer_max.htm

E. B. White: Born July 11, 1899

ebwhite_newyorker

INTERVIEWER
You were also an artist. What did Thurber and the other New Yorker artists think of your drawings and New Yorker covers?
WHITE
I’m not an artist and never did any drawings for The New Yorker. I did turn in a cover and it was published. I can’t draw or paint, but I was sick in bed with tonsillitis or something, and I had nothing to occupy me, but I had a cover idea—of a sea horse wearing a nose bag. I borrowed my son’s watercolor set, copied a sea horse from a picture in Webster’s dictionary, and managed to produce a cover that was bought. It wasn’t much of a thing. I even loused up the whole business finally by printing the word “oats” on the nose bag, lest somebody fail to get the point. I suppose the original of that cover would be a collector’s item of a minor sort, since it is my only excursion into the world of art. But I don’t know where it is. I gave it to Jed Harris. What he did with it, knows God.
http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4155/the-art-of-the-essay-no-1-e-b-white

https://www.britannica.com/biography/E-B-White

The United States of America: Born July 4, 1776

painting

This painting depicts the moment on June 28, 1776, when the first draft of the Declaration of Independence was presented to the Second Continental Congress.

This is the first completed painting of four Revolutionary-era scenes that the U.S. Congress commissioned from John Trumbull (1756–1843) in 1817. It is an enlarged version of a smaller painting (approximately 21 inches by 31 inches) that the artist had created as part of a series to document the events of the American revolution.

When Trumbull was planning the smaller painting in 1786, he decided not to attempt a wholly accurate rendering of the scene; rather, he made his goal the preservation of the images of the Nation’s founders. He excluded those for whom no authoritative image could be found or created, and he included delegates who were not in attendance at the time of the event. In all, 47 individuals (42 of the 56 signers and 5 other patriots) are depicted, all painted from life or life portraits. Some of the room’s architectural features (e.g., the number and placement of doors and windows) differ from historical fact, having been based on an inaccurate sketch that Thomas Jefferson produced from memory in Paris. Trumbull also painted more elegant furniture, covered the windows with heavy draperies rather than venetian blinds, and decorated the room’s rear wall with captured British military flags, believing that such trophies were probably displayed there.
http://www.aoc.gov/capitol-hill/historic-rotunda-paintings/declaration-independence

Anne Frank: Born June 12, 1929

Anne_Frank_Diary_at_Anne_Frank_Museum_in_Berlin-pages-92-93Photograph: Anne_Frank_Diary_at_Anne_Frank_Museum_in_Berlin-pages-92-93.jpg
Source: http://www.heatheronhertravels.com/inspired-by-the-anne-frank-museum-in-berlin/

hoopSince it was first published in 1947, Anne Frank’s diary has become one of the most powerful memoirs of the Holocaust. Its message of courage and hope in the face of adversity has reached millions. The diary has been translated into 67 languages with over 30 million copies sold. Anne Frank’s story is especially meaningful to young people today. For many she is their first, if not their only exposure to the history of the Holocaust.

http://annefrank.com/about-anne-frank/who-is-anne/

© Anne Frank Haus / Anne Frank Fonds

© Anne Frank Haus / Anne Frank Fonds

Anne Frank and Her Family~ http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/nazioccupation/annefrank.html

The Secret Annex Online~ http://www.annefrank.org/en/Subsites/Home/Enter-the-3D-house/#/house/20/help/

Bill “Bojangles” Robinson: Born May 25, 1878

SundayNews

“The Hot Mikado,” starring Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, was a big Broadway hit. It was noted for its wild costuming and all black cast. It ran at the Broadhurst Theater, in Manhattan, from March 23 to June 3, 1939.
Producer Mike Todd announced he was moving the show to the New York World’s Fair. The show became one of the biggest hits at the fair and opened at the Hall of Music on June 22, 1939.
http://www.qchron.com/qboro/i_have_often_walked/bill-bojangles-robinson/article_81b0281a-c1ee-5853-ae31-f810fb8b92a7.html

Silent movie film footage of the Michael Todd production at the New York World’s Fair 1939-1940:

Erskine Hawkins Orchestra – Two Selections from “Hot Mikado”~
https://archive.org/details/ErskineHawkinsOrchestra-TwoSelectionsFromhotMikado

The New York Public Library Digital Collections: “Hot Mikado”~
http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/vandamm-theatrical-photographs-1900-1957#/?tab=navigation&roots=0e546ea0-c5ab-012f-2db0-58d385a7bc34/80:a36a93d0-c5ac-012f-0fad-58d385a7bc34

HotMikadoOvrtur database for “Hot Mikado”~ http://www.ovrtur.com/production/2880750#pagetop

Bill “Bojangles” Robinson~ http://atdf.org/awards/bojangles.html