Metamorphosis in Art, Part 1 of 2~

Metamorphosis II, 1939-1940, by M.C. Escher (1898-1972) / https://mcescher.com/about/biography/
Woodcut on paper / Boston Public Library / https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:ww72cb78j

metamorphosis (noun)  me-tə-ˈmȯr-fə-səs 
1a: change of physical form, structure, or substance especially by supernatural means
the metamorphosis of humans into animals

1b: a striking alteration in appearance, character, or circumstances
The company has gone through a series of metamorphoses.

2: a typically marked and more or less abrupt developmental change in the form or structure of an animal (such as a butterfly or a frog) occurring subsequent to birth or hatching
the metamorphosis of caterpillars into butterflies

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/metamorphosis

1. The Metamorphosis of Daphne by Master of the Judgement of Paris (active mid-15th C)
https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artists/master-of-the-judgement-of-paris
Tempera on wood / The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/the-metamorphosis-of-daphne-33148

2. The Metamorphosis of Hermaphrodite and Salmacis, c.1517, by Jan Gossaert (c.1478–1532)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Gossaert
Oil on panel / Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands
https://www.boijmans.nl/en/collection/artworks/3731/the-metamorphosis-of-hermaphrodite-and-salmacis

3. Plate 5 from Dissertation in Insect Generations and Metamorphosis in Surinam, 1719, by Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717)
https://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/maria-sibylla-merian-metamorphosis-art-and-science.html
Hand-colored engraving on paper / National Museum of Women in the Arts, DC
https://nmwa.org/art/collection/plate-5-dissertation-insect-generations-and-metamorphosis-surinam/

4. Les Métamorphoses d’Ovide, before 1886, by Auguste Rodin (1840–1917)
https://rodinmuseum.org/collection/about-auguste-rodin
Plaster / Musée Rodin, Paris, France
https://collections.musee-rodin.fr/fr/museum/rodin/les-metamorphoses-d-ovide/S.02871?anneeDeCreation%5B0%5D=1886&position=91

5. Metamorphosis, 1908, by Piet Mondrian (1872-1944)
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/piet-mondrian
Oil on canvas / Kunstmuseum Den Haag, Netherlands, gift of Sal Slijper
https://rkd.nl/en/explore/images/268881

6. Metamorphosis, 1917, by Gaganendranath Tagore (1867—1938)
https://indianhistorycollective.com/the-satirical-genius-of-gaganendranath-tagore-artistic-indianart-bengals-peasantryclass-cartoons-painting-master/
Collection of 16 lithographs bound in one volume / Various collections incl. V&A, London, UK
https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1171926/metamorphosis-lithograph-tagore-gaganendranath/

7. Metamorphosis, 1936, by Herbert Bayer (1900-1985)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Bayer
Gelatin silver print / Various collections including The Met, NYC
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/265442

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Monday, February 6: Metamorphosis in Art, Part 2 of 2

Metamorphosis III, 1967–1968, by M.C. Escher (1898-1972) / https://mcescher.com/about/biography/
Woodcut on paper mounted on canvas, partly colored by hand / Boston Public Library
https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:ww72cb78j

Dandelions in Art, Part 2 of 2~

“Taraxacum officinale, the dandelion or common dandelion, is a flowering herbaceous perennial plant, well known for its yellow flower heads that turn into round balls of silver-tufted fruits that disperse in the wind.
The common dandelion grows in temperate regions of the world in areas with moist soils. It is most often considered a weed, especially in lawns and along roadsides, but the leaves, flowers, and roots are sometimes used in herbal medicine and as food.”
~https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum_officinale

The Dandelion

O dandelion, rich and haughty,
King of village flowers!
Each day is coronation time,
You have no humble hours.
I like to see you bring a troop
To beat the blue-grass spears,
To scorn the lawn-mower that would be
Like fate’s triumphant shears.
Your yellow heads are cut away,
It seems your reign is o’er.
By noon you raise a sea of stars
More golden than before.
~Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/vachel-lindsay

10. Happy, Happy It Is To Be, illustration by Dorothy Pulis Lathrop (1891-1980)
https://www.bellusfineart.com/artists/dorothy-pulis-lathrop/
From Walter de la Mare’s Down-Adown-Derry, published 1922, Constable & Co. Ltd, London
https://archive.org/details/downadownderrybo00delauoft/page/58/mode/2up

11. “Certainly, I am a little wild,” remarked Danny Dandelion, illustration by T. Benjamin Faucett (1884-1966)
http://strippersguide.blogspot.com/2013/03/ink-slinger-profiles-t-benjamin-faucett.html
From Frolicsome Flowers:They See the Wonderful Rajah Rug, written and illustrated by
T. Benjamin Faucett, published 1924, A. L. Burt, New York

https://50watts.com/filter/forgotten-illustrator/Frolicsome-Flowers-of-Evil

12. The Dandelion (Study for Hide-and-Seek), 1939, by Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pavel_Tchelitchew
Gouache and watercolor on colored paper / Museum of Modern Art, NYC
https://www.moma.org/collection/works/36474

13. Une Costume ‘Pisenlit’ pour le ballet ‘Tristan Fou, 1944, by Salvador Dalí (1904-1989)
https://www.salvador-dali.org/en/dali/bio-dali/
Mixed media and collage on paper / Private collection
https://www.artnet.com/artists/salvador-dal%C3%AD/une-costume-pisenlit-pour-le-ballet-tristan-fou-0JOFE2LX4QngtRB1iuvBg2

14. Dandelions, 1945, by Kate Neufeld (1905-2004)
Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online~ bit.ly/3GZuDjF
Linoleum cut / Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio
https://www.clevelandart.org/art/1945.66

15. Dandelions, 1985, by Yayoi Kusama (born 1929)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yayoi_Kusama
Lithograph / Edition of 100, Various collections
https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/yayoi-kusama/dandelions

16. Dandelion Floor Lamp, 2003, by Matteo Bazzicalupo and Raffaella Mangiarotti
http://www.deepdesign.it/en/studio/biography/
Varnished sheet metal and polycarbonate / Museum of Modern Art, NYC
https://www.moma.org/collection/works/120852
Image: https://raffaellamangiarotti.com/Dandelion

17. Dandelion Eye, 2009, by Sylvia Fein (born 1919)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvia_Fein
Egg tempera on board / Collection of the artist
https://hyperallergic.com/529354/sylvia-fein-matrix-275-bampfa-berkeley/

18. Dandelions, 2011, by David Hockney (born 1937)
https://www.thedavidhockneyfoundation.org/chronology
iPad drawing printed on paper / Archeus/Post-Modern Ltd., London, UK
https://www.archeus.com/artists/art-for-sale/dandelions-david-hockney?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Monday, January 16th: Dandelions in Art, Part 1 of 2
https://schristywolfe.com/2023/01/16/dandelions-in-art-part-1-of-2/

 

Dandelions in Art, Part 1 of 2~

“Taraxacum officinale, the dandelion or common dandelion, is a flowering herbaceous perennial plant, well known for its yellow flower heads that turn into round balls of silver-tufted fruits that disperse in the wind.
The common dandelion grows in temperate regions of the world in areas with moist soils. It is most often considered a weed, especially in lawns and along roadsides, but the leaves, flowers, and roots are sometimes used in herbal medicine and as food.”
~https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taraxacum_officinale

The First Dandelion
Simple and fresh and fair from winter’s close emerging,

As if no artifice of fashion, business, politics, had ever been,
Forth from its sunny nook of shelter’d grass—innocent, golden,
calm as the dawn,
The spring’s first dandelion shows its trustful face.
~Walt Whitman (1819-1892) https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/walt-whitman

1. Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) with a caterpillar from The Book of Flower Studies, c.1510–1515, by Master of Claude de France
https://frenchly.us/art-master-of-claude-de-france/
Opaque water color, organic glazes, gold and silver paint, iron and carbon-based ink and charcoal on parchment / The Met Cloisters, New York, NY
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/823979

2. A Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) with a Tiger Moth, a Butterfly, a Snail, and a Beetle, c.1730, by Barbara Regina Dietzsch (1706-1783)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Regina_Dietzsch
Opaque watercolor on parchment / Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
https://www.famsf.org/artworks/a-dandelion-taraxacum-officinale-with-a-tiger-moth-a-butterfly-a-snail-and-a-beetle

3. Spring Rain Collection (Harusame shū), vol. 3: Sparrows and Dandelions, c.1820 by Teisai Hokuba (1771-1844)
https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/term/BIOG1797
Privately published woodblock prints (surimono) mounted in an album; ink and color on paper / The Met Fifth Avenue, New York, NY
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/54148

4. Dandelion (Taraxacum Officinale), c. 1854, by Anna Atkins (1799-1871)
https://schristywolfe.com/2018/03/16/anna-atkins-born-march-16-1799/
Cyanotype on paper / Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK
https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O82810/dandelion-taraxacum-officinale-photograph-atkins-anna/

5. Dandelion Seeds, 1858 or later, by William Henry Fox Talbot (1800–1877)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Fox_Talbot
Photogravure / The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC
https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/285342

6. Dandelions, 1867–68, by Jean-François Millet (1814–1875)
https://www.nga.gov/collection/artist-info.1720.html
Pastel on tan wove paper / Museum of Fine Arts Boston, MA
https://collections.mfa.org/objects/31640/dandelions?ctx=b188ba7b-3b8e-411d-85c1-9bd17545e848&idx=0

7. Tree trunks in the grass, 1890, by Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890)
https://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/en/art-and-stories/vincents-life-1853-1890
Oil on canvas / Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands
https://krollermuller.nl/en/vincent-van-gogh-tree-trunks-in-the-grass

8. Dandelions, ND, by Bertha Wegmann (1847-1926)
https://www.portraitsociety.org/single-post/an-introduction-to-bertha-wegmann
Oil on canvas / Private collection
https://onlineonly.christies.com/s/british-european-art-online/bertha-wegmann-danish-1847-1926-108/171771

9. Dandelions, c.1900, by Ludwik Stasiak (1858-1924)
https://rkd.nl/en/explore/artists/124863
Oil on canvas / Stanisław Fischer Museum, Bochnia, Poland
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ludwik_Stasiak_-_Dmuchawce.jpg
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Monday, January 23rd: Dandelions in Art, Part 2 of 2
https://schristywolfe.com/2023/01/23/dandelions-in-art-part-2-of-2/

January First: Happy New Year!

Jessie Willcox Smith

During the latter part of the 19th century, when printing technology allowed magazines to begin producing full color covers, there began an era known as The Golden Age of Illustration. Probably one of the more famous artists who came from that era was Joseph Christian Leyendecker.

https://schristywolfe.com/2018/01/01/january-first-happy-new-year-3/

Among his 400+ magazine covers are the Baby New Years he painted for The Saturday Evening Post from 1906 to 1943. However, there were lots of other magazines who would devote their New Year covers to Baby New Year — or, at any rate, a baby of some sort.
Not all of the covers shared here are from the Golden Age of Illustration, which is generally described as lasting from the 1880s to the 1920s. But there’s plenty of fine illustrators to be found: Walter Beach Humphrey, Rea Irvin, Jessie Willcox Smith, Vernon Thomas, Charles Twelvetrees, and more.

  1. The Country Gentleman, January 1, 1921 by Walter Beach Humphrey
  2. Good Housekeeping, January 1925, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  3. Child Life, January 1928, by Hazel Frazee
  4. Good Housekeeping, January 1929, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  5. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1930 (could not find this artist)
  6. Good Housekeeping, January 1932, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  7. Collier’s, January 2, 1932 by Charles Twelvetrees
  8. The New Yorker, January 2, 1932, by Rea Irvin
  9. Good Housekeeping, January 1933, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  10. Collier’s, January 6, 1934 by Charles Twelvetrees
  11. Good Housekeeping, January 1935, by Vernon Thomas
  12. Good Housekeeping, January 1936, by Vernon Thomas
  13. Good Housekeeping, January 1937, by Horace C. Gaffron
  14. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1938, by R. James Stuart
  15. The New Yorker, December 1938, by Rea Irvin

Click on pictures to enlarge and scroll through them:

C

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering
By sally edelstein / May 30, 2016

Memorial Day has the word “memorial” for a reason

More than a Monday spent at beaches, backyard barbecues and blockbuster movies, Memorial Day is the day we remember and honor those who died serving our country.

Unlike Veterans Day it is not a celebration; it was intended to be a day of solemn contemplation over the high cost of freedom.

Come together

In this time of divisiveness and polarization, of spectacle and mud-slinging, it is more than ever important to stop, come together, and remember those who have given their all.

Today we pay homage to all the soldiers who didn’t come home.

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering

https://envisioningtheamericandream.com/