January First: Happy New Year!

Jessie Willcox Smith

During the latter part of the 19th century, when printing technology allowed magazines to begin producing full color covers, there began an era known as The Golden Age of Illustration. Probably one of the more famous artists who came from that era was Joseph Christian Leyendecker.

https://schristywolfe.com/2018/01/01/january-first-happy-new-year-3/

Among his 400+ magazine covers are the Baby New Years he painted for The Saturday Evening Post from 1906 to 1943. However, there were lots of other magazines who would devote their New Year covers to Baby New Year — or, at any rate, a baby of some sort.
Not all of the covers shared here are from the Golden Age of Illustration, which is generally described as lasting from the 1880s to the 1920s. But there’s plenty of fine illustrators to be found: Walter Beach Humphrey, Rea Irvin, Jessie Willcox Smith, Vernon Thomas, Charles Twelvetrees, and more.

  1. The Country Gentleman, January 1, 1921 by Walter Beach Humphrey
  2. Good Housekeeping, January 1925, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  3. Child Life, January 1928, by Hazel Frazee
  4. Good Housekeeping, January 1929, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  5. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1930 (could not find this artist)
  6. Good Housekeeping, January 1932, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  7. Collier’s, January 2, 1932 by Charles Twelvetrees
  8. The New Yorker, January 2, 1932, by Rea Irvin
  9. Good Housekeeping, January 1933, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  10. Collier’s, January 6, 1934 by Charles Twelvetrees
  11. Good Housekeeping, January 1935, by Vernon Thomas
  12. Good Housekeeping, January 1936, by Vernon Thomas
  13. Good Housekeeping, January 1937, by Horace C. Gaffron
  14. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1938, by R. James Stuart
  15. The New Yorker, December 1938, by Rea Irvin

Click on pictures to enlarge and scroll through them:

C

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering
By sally edelstein / May 30, 2016

Memorial Day has the word “memorial” for a reason

More than a Monday spent at beaches, backyard barbecues and blockbuster movies, Memorial Day is the day we remember and honor those who died serving our country.

Unlike Veterans Day it is not a celebration; it was intended to be a day of solemn contemplation over the high cost of freedom.

Come together

In this time of divisiveness and polarization, of spectacle and mud-slinging, it is more than ever important to stop, come together, and remember those who have given their all.

Today we pay homage to all the soldiers who didn’t come home.

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering

https://envisioningtheamericandream.com/

Call for Artists | U.S. Mint

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The United States Mint is seeking professional artists to join our AIP via a Call for Artists. The AIP is a pool of talented American artists who enrich and invigorate our Nation’s coins and medals through the development of specialized designs. AIP artists are:

  • Paid a set fee per assignment and earn a bonus fee of $5,000 per design selected for minting
  • Named as designer in historical documents, Certificates of Authenticity and promotional materials, and in most cases, have their initials appear on the final coin or medal
  • Able to work from their own studios

via Call for Artists | U.S. Mint

I Want To Hold Your Hand

February 1, 1964 was the day that a Beatles song hit Number One for the first time in the USA. The song was “I Want To Hold Your Hand”. The Beatles flew into JFK on February 7 and made their first appearance on Ed Sullivan two days later. And we all had a gear time!

https://www.rockhall.com/inductees/beatles
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/100-greatest-beatles-songs-20110919/i-want-to-hold-your-hand-19691231

January First: Happy New Year!

Link~ J.C. Leyendecker, Father of the New Year’s Baby

“Joseph Christian Leyendecker wasn’t the first artist to use an infant to represent the new year. But over the span of 36 years, he made the New Year’s baby as familiar to Americans as Father Time.

A consummate illustrator — and mentor to Norman Rockwell — Leyendecker was continually searching for better ways to depict the holidays. He created many fanciful covers that caught the spirit of Christmas, Fourth of July, Easter, and Thanksgiving. But the New Year’s babies are arguably his most memorable.

His first baby was delivered for the December 29, 1906, issue of the Post. It shows a cherub atop a globe, turning over a fresh page in a book of New Year’s resolutions. The series continue without interruption until 1943…”
http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2014/12/31/art-entertainment/art-and-artists/new-years-babies.html