January 1, 2020~ Happy New Year!

New Year’s Baby by Joseph Christian Leyendecker

1920 / Oil on canvas / 28”x21” / Private collection
Cover art for The Saturday Evening Post, January 3, 1920

[There are four embedded links above]

Previous January 1 posts:
January First 2018: Happy New Year!
January First 2017: Happy New Year!
January First 2016: Happy New Year!
The Four Seasons: Winter
Winter~ January 1

January 1~

December 26, 2019~ The day after Christmas (Boxing Day)

The Day after Christmas by Mark Lancelot Symons

c.1931 / Oil on canvas on board / 35 4/5”x26 3/4” / Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, Bury, UK

[There are three embedded links above]

The Day of the Wren: The Question of Boxing Day~
http://ultimatehistoryproject.com/boxing-day.html

Previous December 26 posts:

December 26~ Animals in Art

December 26~

January First: Happy New Year!

Link~ J.C. Leyendecker, Father of the New Year’s Baby

Joseph Christian Leyendecker wasn’t the first artist to use an infant to represent the new year. But over the span of 36 years, he made the New Year’s baby as familiar to Americans as Father Time.

A consummate illustrator — and mentor to Norman Rockwell — Leyendecker was continually searching for better ways to depict the holidays. He created many fanciful covers that caught the spirit of Christmas, Fourth of July, Easter, and Thanksgiving. But the New Year’s babies are arguably his most memorable.

His first baby was delivered for the December 29, 1906, issue of the Post. It shows a cherub atop a globe, turning over a fresh page in a book of New Year’s resolutions. The series continue without interruption until 1943.
http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2014/12/31/art-entertainment/art-and-artists/new-years-babies.html

The United States of America: Born July 4, 1776

painting

This painting depicts the moment on June 28, 1776, when the first draft of the Declaration of Independence was presented to the Second Continental Congress.

This is the first completed painting of four Revolutionary-era scenes that the U.S. Congress commissioned from John Trumbull (1756–1843) in 1817. It is an enlarged version of a smaller painting (approximately 21 inches by 31 inches) that the artist had created as part of a series to document the events of the American revolution.

When Trumbull was planning the smaller painting in 1786, he decided not to attempt a wholly accurate rendering of the scene; rather, he made his goal the preservation of the images of the Nation’s founders. He excluded those for whom no authoritative image could be found or created, and he included delegates who were not in attendance at the time of the event. In all, 47 individuals (42 of the 56 signers and 5 other patriots) are depicted, all painted from life or life portraits. Some of the room’s architectural features (e.g., the number and placement of doors and windows) differ from historical fact, having been based on an inaccurate sketch that Thomas Jefferson produced from memory in Paris. Trumbull also painted more elegant furniture, covered the windows with heavy draperies rather than venetian blinds, and decorated the room’s rear wall with captured British military flags, believing that such trophies were probably displayed there.
http://www.aoc.gov/capitol-hill/historic-rotunda-paintings/declaration-independence

The Resurrection in Art

Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday, two days after Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion. It is the central tenet of Christian theology. The Resurrection of Christ has been portrayed by artists for 2,000 years; I thought it would be appropriate at Easter to take an (obviously lightning fast) overview of how some painters have depicted it. (Click image to enlarge).

GreekAnonymous
The Resurrection
11th century
Mosaic
Monastery of Hosios Loukas, Greece

Psalter

Anonymous
Manuscript Leaf with the Resurrection, from a Psalter
13th century
Tempera, ink, gold, and silver on parchment
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

AlabasterAnonymous
Paneled altarpiece section with Resurrection of Christ
15th century
English Nottingham alabaster with remains of colour
Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, MD

Andrea della Robbia (1435–1525)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Resurrection
15th century
Enamelled Terracotta
Bode-Museum, Berlin, Germany

FrancescaPiero della Francesca (1420-1492)
The Resurrection of Jesus Christ
1463
Mural in fresco and tempera
Museo Civico, Sansepolcro, Italy

Raphael (1483-1520)Raphael
The Resurrection of Jesus Christ
1499-1502
Oil on panel
São Paulo Museum of Art, Brazil

RubensPeter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)
The Resurrection of Christ
1611-1612
Oil on panel
Antwerp Cathedral, Belgium

Blake

William Blake (1757-1827)
Christ Appearing to His Disciples After the Resurrection
1795
Monotype hand-colored with watercolor and tempera
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

ManetÉdouard Manet (1832–1883)
The Dead Christ with Angels
1864
Oil on canvasMetropolitan Museum of Art, New York City

Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833–1898)
The Morning of the Resurrection
1886
Oil paint on wood
Tate Gallery, London, UKThe Morning of the Resurrection 1886 by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, Bt 1833-1898