The United States of America: Born July 4, 1776

painting

This painting depicts the moment on June 28, 1776, when the first draft of the Declaration of Independence was presented to the Second Continental Congress.

This is the first completed painting of four Revolutionary-era scenes that the U.S. Congress commissioned from John Trumbull (1756–1843) in 1817. It is an enlarged version of a smaller painting (approximately 21 inches by 31 inches) that the artist had created as part of a series to document the events of the American revolution.

When Trumbull was planning the smaller painting in 1786, he decided not to attempt a wholly accurate rendering of the scene; rather, he made his goal the preservation of the images of the Nation’s founders. He excluded those for whom no authoritative image could be found or created, and he included delegates who were not in attendance at the time of the event. In all, 47 individuals (42 of the 56 signers and 5 other patriots) are depicted, all painted from life or life portraits. Some of the room’s architectural features (e.g., the number and placement of doors and windows) differ from historical fact, having been based on an inaccurate sketch that Thomas Jefferson produced from memory in Paris. Trumbull also painted more elegant furniture, covered the windows with heavy draperies rather than venetian blinds, and decorated the room’s rear wall with captured British military flags, believing that such trophies were probably displayed there.
http://www.aoc.gov/capitol-hill/historic-rotunda-paintings/declaration-independence

Memorial Day a Day For Remembering

Envisioning The American Dream

collage Vintage 60s 2 men toasting Memorial Day Barbecue and vintage illustration WWII soldier On Memorial Day we pay homage to all the soldiers who didn’t come home. To all those we lost in WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, Iraqi, and Afghanistan, this Buds for you!

Memorial Day has the word “memorial” for a reason

More than a Monday spent at beaches, backyard barbecues and blockbuster movies, Memorial Day is the day we remember and honor those who died serving our country.

Unlike Veterans Day it is not a celebration; it was intended to be a day of solemn contemplation over the high cost of freedom.

Come together

In this time of divisiveness and polarization, of spectacle and mud-slinging, it is more than ever important to stop, come together, and remember those who have given their all.

Today we pay homage to all the soldiers who didn’t come home.

We Must Remember This

vintage ad wwII nash kelvinator illustration soldiers Vintage ad 1944 Illustration Fred Luderkens

During WWII the grimness of…

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Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday, two days after Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion. It is the central tenet of Christian theology. The Resurrection of Christ has been portrayed by artists for 2,000 years; I thought it would be appropriate at Easter to take an (obviously lightning fast) overview of how some painters have depicted it. (Click image to enlarge).

GreekAnonymous
The Resurrection
11th century
Mosaic
Monastery of Hosios Loukas, Greece

Psalter

Anonymous
Manuscript Leaf with the Resurrection, from a Psalter
13th century
Tempera, ink, gold, and silver on parchment
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

AlabasterAnonymous
Paneled altarpiece section with Resurrection of Christ
15th century
English Nottingham alabaster with remains of colour
Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, MD

Andrea della Robbia (1435–1525)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Resurrection
15th century
Enamelled Terracotta
Bode-Museum, Berlin, Germany

FrancescaPiero della Francesca (1420-1492)
The Resurrection of Jesus Christ
1463
Mural in fresco and tempera
Museo Civico, Sansepolcro, Italy

Raphael (1483-1520)Raphael
The Resurrection of Jesus Christ
1499-1502
Oil on panel
São Paulo Museum of Art, Brazil

RubensPeter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)
The Resurrection of Christ
1611-1612
Oil on panel
Antwerp Cathedral, Belgium

Blake

William Blake (1757-1827)
Christ Appearing to His Disciples After the Resurrection
1795
Monotype hand-colored with watercolor and tempera
National Gallery of Art, Washington DC

ManetÉdouard Manet (1832–1883)
The Dead Christ with Angels
1864
Oil on canvasMetropolitan Museum of Art, New York City

Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1833–1898)
The Morning of the Resurrection
1886
Oil paint on wood
Tate Gallery, London, UKThe Morning of the Resurrection 1886 by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, Bt 1833-1898

Pysanky~ Ukrainian Easter Eggs

http://www.pysanka.com/the_art.php
http://www.learnpysanky.com/designs.html

The Ukrainian pysanka (from the word pysaty, to write) was believed to possess an enormous power not only in the egg itself, which harbored the nucleus of life, but also in the symbolic designs and colors which were drawn upon the egg in a specific manner, according to prescribed rituals. The intricately colored eggs were used for various social and religious occasions and were considered to be a talisman, a protector against evil, as well as harbingers of good.
http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/pysanky.html

Fabergé Imperial Easter Eggs

The series of Easter eggs created by Fabergé for the Russian Imperial family, from 1885 through to 1916…A centuries-old tradition of bringing hand-coloured eggs to Church to be blessed and then presented to friends and family had evolved through the years and, among the highest echelons of St Petersburg society, the custom developed of presenting valuable bejewelled Easter gifts. So it was that Emperor Alexander III had the idea of commissioning Fabergé to create a precious Easter egg as a surprise for his Empress. The first Imperial Easter egg was born…From 1887 Fabergé was given complete freedom in the design and execution, with the only prerequisite being that there had to be surprise within each creation.
http://www.faberge.com/news/49_imperial-eggs.aspx

fabergeczarevichegg

Beautiful photographs and more information here~ https://elliottingotham.wordpress.com/1301-2/

This automaton was made as the ‘surprise’ for the Diamond Trellis Egg, made by Carl Fabergé for Tsar Alexander III. The Tsar presented the egg to his wife Tsarina Marie Feodorovna for Easter 1892.
https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/9268

February 8~ Chinese New Year 2016

Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, is the most important Chinese traditional festival. Chinese New Year (CNY) celebrations run from Chinese New Year’s Eve, the last day of the last month of the lunar calendar, to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first lunar month, making the festival the longest in the Chinese calendar.

Legend says that there was a man-eating beast, “nian”, in ancient China. “Nian” would come from the mountain once a year on the New Year Eve and infiltrate houses silently to prey on humans and animals. People later learned that “nian” was afraid of loud noises and the colour red, so people use explosives, fireworks and colour red to scare “nian” away.

CNY is centuries old and gains significance because of several myths and traditions. Traditionally, the festival was a time to honour deities as well as ancestors. It is a time for family reunion and celebration. It is as important as the Thanksgiving Day and Christmas combined in the Western culture.

More information can be found at this wonderful blog:

Source: Chinese New Year custom (農曆新年習俗)