Gertrude Käsebier: Born May 18, 1852

GertrudeKasebier

Gertrude Käsebier was a leading member of the pioneering photographic known as Pictorialism, which emphasized a subjective, painterly approach to photography rather than a documentary one.  

Kasebier1Though she had long been interested in art, Käsebier only began her formal training at the Pratt Institute after her children entered high school. She planned to be a painter, but eventually switched to photography. Following classes in Paris and apprenticeships with a German photographic chemist, and a Brooklyn portrait photographer, Käsebier opened her own portrait studio in 1897.
http://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/gertrude-k%C3%A4sebierKasebier2

Stieglitz included Käsebier as a founding member of the Photo-Secession, a group that argued for a more natural, less manipulated photograph. In 1899, he published five of her photos, declaring her “beyond dispute, the leading artistic portrait photographer of the day.”
GKhttp://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2012/05/12/nearly-forgotten-mother-of-modern-american-photography-gertrude-kaeseb

Library of Congress Biographical Essay: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/coll/womphotoj/kasebieressay.html
Library of Congress Online Catalog: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/related/?fi=name&q=K%C3%A4sebier%2C%20Gertrude%2C%201852-1934
Shorpy Photo Gallery: http://www.shorpy.com/gertrude-kasebier-photographs

May 15, 1970~ Tragedy at Jackson State

The shootings at Mississippi’s Jackson State University still linger in the shadow of Kent State. Less than two weeks after Kent, two black students were killed and 12 others wounded by state troopers on May 15, 1970.

The incident started after student demonstrators, protesting the Vietnam War and seeking more rights at the historically black college, responded to an order to disperse by throwing stones and bottles. It ended as police opened fire outside a women’s dormitory.

Phillip Gibbs, 21, a junior preparing for law school, who had a child and a pregnant wife, and James Earl Green, 17, a high school track star on his way home from his job at a grocery store, were killed.

A presidential commission later found the shootings at Jackson and Kent “completely unjustified.” No one was indicted.
May 15th, 1970: 2 Black Students Killed & 12 Wounded by Police During Vietnam Antiwar Protest~ http://may1970project.org/?p=18

Remembering What Happened At Jackson State College In 1970~ http://wyso.org/post/remembering-what-happened-jackson-state-college-1970
MIssissippi Digital Library~ http://tinyurl.com/nlullqw

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William Grant Still~ Born May 11, 1895


William Grant Still (1895-1978)
African American Composer, Arranger, Conductor & Oboist
Dean of African American Composers
http://chevalierdesaintgeorges.homestead.com/still.html

On this date in 1895, William Grant Still was born. He was an African American musician and composer.

Still was the first African American to conduct a major symphony orchestra, the first African-American to have an opera, “Troubled Island” (1949) performed by a major opera company, and the first to have an opera, “A Bayou Legend,” performed on national television (1981).

The period from 1926 to the early 1940s was Still’s most prolific. During this time he wrote “Levee Land” (1925), a suite for orchestra and soprano that combines traditional western musical elements with jazz; “From the Black Belt” (1926), a work for chamber orchestra based on seven short character sketches; “Sahdji” (1930), a choral ballet based on an African story, and “Afro-American Symphony.”
http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/william-grant-still-symphonic-composer

https://william-grant-still-music.myshopify.com/pages/biography

Rudolph Valentino: Born May 6, 1895

While in New York during the spring of 1923, Rudolph Valentino paid a visit to the Brunswick studios and recorded two songs. El Relicario in Spanish and The Kashmiri Song in English. According to legend, Valentino recorded these songs for his new bride, Natacha Rambova since they had recently wed after a few very tense years of legal difficulties concerning Valentino’s divorce from Jean Acker.
It was reported that after he heard his voice, he quipped “There goes my opera career!
http://www.rudolph-valentino.com/rv-voice.htm

May 4, 1970~ Tragedy at Kent State

NYTRead the full text of The Times article:
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0504.html

This link is to a “collection…of photographs and contact sheets produced by University News Service (now University Communications and Marketing) before, during, and after the May 4, 1970 shootings at Kent State University. The first photographs were taken on April 30 to May 3, 1970. This group consists of a small number of photos. The bulk of the photographs were taken on May 4, 1970. Other photographs include events immediately after the shootings and some annual commemorations.” http://www.library.kent.edu/university-news-service-photographs-may-1-4-1970

This link is to “a repository of information managed by WKSU-FM about the 1970 shootings at Kent State University. On May 4th, 1970 Ohio National Guard troops opened fire on students, wounding nine and killing four…The materials include photographs, radio station audio, text, and video related to those shootings and their aftermath”Audio and images from May 4, 1970~  http://www.kentstate1970.org//index2

Richard D’Oyly Carte: Born May 3, 1844

Richard D’Oyly Carte, born 1844, died 1901; was theatrical manager of the Royalty Theatre, London, where Trial by Jury was produced in 1875, when he became the originator and promoter of a scheme for English “comedy-opera,” of which the first-fruit was The Sorcerer, brought out at the Opéra Comique, London, on November 17, 1877. H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance, and Patience followed at the same theatre, under the same auspices. In October, 1881, Patience was transferred to the Savoy Theatre, which Richard D’Oyly Carte had built specially for the production of Gilbert-Sullivan pieces, and of which he remained the owner and director, at the same time owning and directing numerous travelling companies both in the British provinces and in America. In January, 1891, he opened, in Cambridge Circus, London,–with Sullivan’s Ivanhoe specially written for the occasion–the English Opera House, of which he had been the projector, but which, in December, 1892, was re-christened the Palace Theatre, and later devoted, under other management, to “variety” performances. D’Oyly Carte himself wrote the music for two dramatic pieces entitled Dr. Ambrosias, his Secret (1887) and Maria (1871).
http://www.theatrehistory.com/british/richard_doyly_carte_001.html

(Click images to enlarge)

Richard D’Oyly Carte~  http://www.gsarchive.net/carte/burleigh.html

Savoy Hotel~  http://www.fairmont.com/savoy-london/hotelhistory/

Savoy Theatre~  http://grimsdyke.com/savoy-theatre-home-gilbert-sullivan/

Victoria and Albert Museum D’Oyly Carte Archive~ https://www.vam.ac.uk/

Savoy Scaffolding etching by James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), D’Oyly Carte was a strong supporter of Whistler and a close friend.

Leonardo da Vinci: Died May 2, 1519

death

Francis I Receives the Last Breaths of Leonardo da Vinci
by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 1818 • Petit Palais, Paris, France

We know that Leonardo, who had come to France at the invitation of Francis I, died in Amboise in 1519. The undoubtedly fictitious story of his death in the presence of the king comes from The Lives by Vasari. This work, which appeared in 1550, celebrates the excellence of Italian painting following an ascending curve that starts with Cimabue and ends with Michelangelo and Raphael. http://www.petitpalais.paris.fr/en/oeuvre/francis-i-receives-last-breaths-leonardo-da-vinci