William Henry Jackson: Born on April 4, 1843

jackson2

From age twelve until age ninety-nine, William Henry Jackson was involved on some level with photography. After a tour of duty in the Civil War, he headed West and eventually settled in Omaha, Nebraska, where he opened a portrait photography studio with his brother Edward. As Jackson explained, however, “Portrait photography never had any charms for me, so I sought my subjects from the house-tops, and finally from the hill-tops and about the surrounding country; the taste strengthening as my successes became greater in proportion to the failures.” In 1870 he accompanied geologist Ferdinand Vandiveer Hayden on an expedition across Wyoming, along the Green River, and eventually into the Yellowstone Lake area. Jackson’s images were the first published photographs of Yellowstone. Partly on the strength of these photographs, the area became America’s first national park in March 1872.

On one of several independent expeditions that he headed, Jackson also became the first to photograph the prehistoric Native American dwellings in Mesa Verde, Colorado. He finally settled in Denver, Colorado, where he worked as a commercial landscape photographer and continued to publish his photographs as postcards. 
http://www.getty.edu/art/collection/artists/1853/william-henry-jackson-american-1843-1942/

http://www.iphf.org/hall-of-fame/william-henry-jackson/Jackson1

March 30~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Chakaia Booker (Born 1953)
African-American sculptor best known for her work using tires as a medium
https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/chakaia-booker

Urban Butterfly / 2001 / Rubber tires / 57”x53”

 

Kiki Smith (Born 1954)
German-born American artist’s work includes sculpture, printmaking, photography, drawing, and textiles
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/kiki-smith

Lilith / 1994 / Bronze with glass eyes / 31 1/2”x27”x17 1/2”

March 29~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Judy Chicago (Born 1939)
American feminist artist, art educator, and writer known for large collaborative art installations
https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/chicago-judy

Female Rejection Drawing from the Rejection Quintet / 1974 / Colored pencil and graphite on paper / 40”x30”

 

Carrie Mae Weems (Born 1953)
African-American photographer, performance artist, activist, filmmaker, and videographer
http://carriemaeweems.net/bio.html

Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) / 1990 / Gelatin silver print / 27 1/4”x27”

March 25~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Agnes Martin (1912-2004)
Canadian-American artist, often described as Minimalist, considered herself an Abstract Expressionist
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/agnes-martin

Happy Holiday / 1999 / Acrylic paint and graphite on canvas / 60”x60”x1.5”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Méret Oppenheim (1913-1985)
German-born Swiss artist produced sculptures, paintings, photographs, drawings, and assemblages
https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/meret-oppenheim

Wolke auf einem Schiff (Cloud on a Boat) / 1963 / Plaster and paint / 14 9/16”x13”x4 3/4”

March 22~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

 

Lee Miller (1907-1977)
American Fashion and fine art photographer, photojournalist, Surrealist artist, writer, and model
https://www.nationalgalleries.org/art-and-artists/features/lee-miller

Women in fire masks, Downshire Hill, Hampstead, London / 1941 / American Vogue magazine

 

 

 

 

Dora Maar (1907-1997)
French Surrealist artist and photographer, painter, and poet
https://www.britannica.com/biography/Dora-Maar

Le Simulateur (The Simulator or The Pretender) / 1936 / Gelatin silver print / 11 1/2”x9”

Pattie Boyd: Born on March 17, 1944

Boyd

Pattie Boyd was a successful Vogue model in the 60s and 70s. During that time, she met and married both George Harrison and Eric Clapton putting her in the enviable position of being able to take intimate photographs of some of the world’s great musicians who came into their lives. This means that amongst her visual archive she has many unique Polaroid’s and vintage prints never seen before.

Pattie’s passion for photography has developed since that time and through her membership of the Royal Photographic society she has studied the great master photographers of the past as well as printing techniques, enabling her to experiment with her images in new and exciting ways. She now explores many avenues in colour and black and white – landscapes, travel and flowers as well as celebrities and musicians.

Pattie has been awarded an L.R.P.S. for her work.
You can view a slideshow of Pattie Boyd’s photography here:
https://www.morrisonhotelgallery.com/photographer/default.aspx?photographerID=29

March 16~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Sarah Purser (1848-1943)
Irish painter, stained glass artist, patron, collector, and administrator
http://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100355481

Le Petit Déjeuner / 1881 / Oil on canvas / 14”x10.5”

 

Gertrude Kasebier (1852-1934)
American portrait photographer; one of the founders of the Photo-Secession group
http://iphf.org/inductees/gertrude-kasebier/

The Sketch / 1903 / Platinum print / 6”x8 1/8”

Anna Atkins: Born March 16, 1799

Anna_Atkins Anna Atkins was born Anna Children in the town of Tonbridge in the English county of Kent. Her mother died soon after she was born and Anna was raised by her father John George Children, who was a chemist, mineralogist, and zoologist. Anna was particularly interested in plant collecting and botany, and in 1823 illustrated her father’s translation of a book on the subject of shells with her own engravings.

Through her father, Atkins knew Sir John Herschel, the inventor of the process known as “cyanotype”. This process, originated in the 1840s, was one of the first non-silver technologies used to create photographic images. It later evolved into the process known by the term “blueprint”, those blue background reproductions of large architectural and mechanical drawings. William Henry Fox Talbot, another acquaintance of the Atkins family, improved upon the chemistry to create what he called the “calotype” and this became the basis for all subsequent negative/positive processes.

BookCover

Anna Atkins recognized that photographic processes were an excellent method to accurately illustrate scientific studies. She began work on her first book British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions using the cyanotype process, which today is often referred to as sun printing. This was a 12-part privately published series which Atkins worked on from 1843 to 1853. Anna Atkins is considered to be the first person to publish a book illustrated with photographic images. However, since it was privately published, her mentor Sir John Herschel is the person credited with producing the first commercially published book illustrated with photographs (The Pencil of Nature, 1844).

Atkins followed her series with two other volumes, British and Foreign Ferns and British and Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns. Atkins collaborated on these books with Anne Austen Dixon, a close childhood friend and incidentally a distant cousin of the novelist Jane Austen. Additionally, Atkins published several other non-botanical volumes, including a memoir of her father.

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Atkins died on June 9th, 1871 at age 72. The cause of death was given as “paralysis, rheumatism, and exhaustion”.

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“Anna Atkins published the first book with photographs. Here are a few of them.”
http://www.vox.com/2015/3/16/8218855/anna-atkins-photographs

“The Cyanotype Process”
http://www.sciencecompany.com/The-Cyanotype-Process.aspx

The New York Public Library Digital Collections: “Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions”
http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/photographs-of-british-algae-cyanotype-impressions#/?tab=navigation&scroll=0

Diane Arbus: Born March 14, 1923

ArbusRemembering Diane Arbus
Arbus is most known for her photographs of social deviants or “freaks.” “There’s a quality of legend about freaks,” Arbus said. “Like a person in a fairy tale who stops you and demands that you answer a riddle. Most people go through life dreading they’ll have a traumatic experience. Freaks were born with their trauma. They’ve already passed their test in life. They’re aristocrats.”
http://darkroom.baltimoresun.com/2015/03/remembering-diane-arbus/#1

February 27~ African-American visual artists

Mark Bradford (Born 1961), African-American painter and mixed-media collage artist
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/mark-bradford

Across 110th Street / 2008 / Mixed-media collage on canvas / 102”x144”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mickalene Thomas (Born 1971), African-American mixed-media artist, filmmaker, and curator
https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/mickalene-thomas

Tamika sur une Chaise Longue Avec Monet / 2012 / Rhinestones, acrylic, oil, and enamel on wood panel / 108”x144”