Pride Month~ June 22


Robert Mapplethorpe (1946-1989)
Photographer left a vast and provocative body of work
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/robert-mapplethorpe

Robert Rauschenberg / 1983 / Gelatine silver print on paper / 18 3/4”x14 7/8”

 

Martin Wong (1946-1999) Painter played a pivotal role in the Lower East Side arts scene in the 80s/90s
http://www.bronxmuseum.org/exhibitions/martin-wong-human-instamatic

Attorney Street (Handball Court with Autobiographical Poem by Piñero) / 1982-84 / Oil on canvas / 35 1/2”x48”

Pride Month~ June 21

Luis Caballero (1943-1995)
Colombian-born artist combined desire and aesthetic beauty
http://miamibiennale.org/miami_biennale_luis_caballero.html

Nu de dos allongé / 1984 / Graphite on paper / 10.6”x14.6”

Gilbert & George (Gilbert Prousch b.1943 and George Passmore b.1942)
“It’s not a collaboration…We are two people, but one artist”
https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/1518

Fates / 2005 / 54 digital prints on paper with ink / 167 11/16”x299 3/16”

Pride Month~ June 19

Cy Twombly (1928-2011) Iconic large-scale marks scribbled and smeared on raw canvas or linen
http://www.galerie-karsten-greve.com/en/cy_twombly/biography

Untitled [Gaeta] / 2007 / Acrylic, wax crayon, lead pencil on wooden panel / 99 1/4”x217 3/8”

Andy Warhol (1928-1987) Artist, director and producer explored popular culture in his work
http://warholfoundation.org/legacy/biography.html

Flowers / 1964 / Offset lithograph / sheet: 22 13/16”x23 1/16″

Pride Month~ June 15


Ruth Bernhard (1905-2006)
German-born American photographer shot almost exclusively in black-and-white
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruth_Bernhard

Doll’s Head / 1936 / Photographic print / 7 11/16”x 9 9/16”(image)

 

Richard Bruce Nugent (1906-1987)
Writer, artist, and illustrator associated with the Harlem Renaissance
https://ubuntubiographyproject.com/2017/07/01/richard-bruce-nugent/

Cover drawing for Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life / Vol. 4, No. 39, March 1926

Pride Month~ June 14

Cecil Beaton (1904-1980)  English photographer, diarist, artist, and designer
http://www.anothermag.com/art-photography/10296/ten-things-you-might-not-know-about-cecil-beaton

Sawai Man Singh II, Maharaja of Jaipur; Maharani Gayatri Devi, Rajmata of Jaipur /
1944 / Modern bromide print / 10”x9 7/8”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Cadmus (1904-1999 ) American artist who epitomized Magic Realism
http://www.notablebiographies.com/supp/Supplement-Ca-Fi/Cadmus-Paul.html

Bar Italia / 1953-1955 / Tempera on wood / 37 1/2”x45 1/4”

Pride Month~ June 12

Berenice Abbott (1898-1991)
Pioneering American documentary photographer
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018/05/10/berenice-abbott-pictures-jazz-age/

Penn Station, Interior, Manhattan / 1935 / Photograph / 23”x 18 1/8”

Betty Parsons (1900-1982)
Abstract painter and sculptor best known as a dealer of mid-century art
http://www.alexandergray.com/artists/betty-parsons

Gold Stipple Moonshot / 1972 / Acrylic on canvas / 48”x48”

Pride Month~ June 10

Erté (1892-1990)  Russian-born French artist, illustrator, and designer
http://gayinfluence.blogspot.com/2013/12/erte.html

Masquerade / 1987 / Embossed serigraph with foil stamping on black paper / 28”x40”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Cahun (1894-1954)
Startlingly original and enigmatic photographic images
https://www.britannica.com/biography/Claude-Cahun

Don’t Kiss Me, I’m in Training (Claude Cahun + Marcel Moore) / 1927 / Monochrome print / 4 5/8”x3 1/2”

Love & War~ May 26

Dorothea LangeLange

Mules

Biographies:
International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum~ http://www.iphf.org/hall-of-fame/dorothea-lange/
PBS~ http://www.pbs.org/video/2365971488/

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) documented the change on the homefront, especially among ethnic groups and workers uprooted by the war. Three months after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt ordered the relocation of Japanese-Americans into armed camps in the West. Soon after, the War Relocation Authority hired Lange to photograph Japanese neighborhoods, processing centers, and camp facilities.

Lange’s earlier work documenting displaced farm families and migrant by Dorothea Langeworkers during the Great Depression did not prepare her for the disturbing racial and civil rights issues raised by the Japanese internment. Lange quickly found herself at odds with her employer and her subjects’ persecutors, the United States government.

To capture the spirit of the camps, Lange created images that frequently juxtapose signs of human courage and dignity with physical evidence of the indignities of incarceration. Not surprisingly, many of Lange’s photographs were censored by the federal government, itself conflicted by the existence of the camps.

The true impact of Lange’s work was not felt until 1972, when the Whitney Museum incorporated twenty-seven of her photographs into Executive Order 9066, an exhibit about the Japanese internment. New York Times critic A.D. Coleman called Lange’s photographs “documents of such a high order that they convey the feelings of the victims as well as the facts of the crime.”
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/wcf/wcf0013.html

 

FatherSonShorpy~ http://www.shorpy.com/dorothea-lange-photographs
National Archives~ https://www.archives.gov/news/articles/japanese-internment-75th-anniversary
National Park Service~ https://www.nps.gov/manz/learn/photosmultimedia/dorothea-lange-gallery.htm

(Learn more by clicking on hyperlinks)

Love & War~ May 25

Charles & Ray Eames

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Charles was a designer with an eye for form. Ray was an artist with an eye for color. They complemented each other on projects like coat hangers, films, their namesake chairs, and large architectural projects. Through four decades of creative work, they revolutionized design and created an indelible mark on American History. The duo was not without faults, but the pair proved to be inseparable and inspirational. They were the Eameses.

The Eames studio—part workshop, part circus— was a partnership of two free spirits: one, an architecture school dropout who never got his license; the other, a painter trained by Hans Hofmann who used objects or any other surface as her canvases. They shunned the term “artist” as pompous.

Charles and Ray Eames arrived in Los Angeles in 1941, a year after they met at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. Charles was married to his first wife, Catherine at the time, but Ray began assisting him and Eero Saarinen in their designs for the Museum of Modern Art’s Organic Design in Home Furnishings Competition, and soon he divorced Catherine and married Ray.

There is always a karmic danger in marrying someone with whom you committed adultery. The women at the company almost uniformly describe him as charismatic. At one point (that we know of), Charles was looking to leave Ray, and was only stopped because the woman confesses, she couldn’t do that to Ray. (, Pasadena Art & Science Beat, https://ageofthegeek.org/2011/11/23/eames-the-architect-and-the-painter-or-why-feminism-matters/ )

Their partnership, which obliterated the distinctions between private and professional lives, inspired numerous contemporary working marriages…Charles and Ray, architect and artist, wanted to do everything — disciplinary boundaries meant nothing to them — and, by and large, succeeded.

The Work of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention
AD Classics: Eames House / Charles and Ray Eames
The Love Letters of Charles & Ray Eames

Love & War~ May 18

Mathew Brady

Mathew Brady is often referred to as the father of photojournalism and is most well known for his documentation of the Civil War. His photographs, and those he commissioned, had a tremendous impact on society at the time of the war, and continue to do so today. He and his employees photographed thousands of images including battlefields, camp life, and portraits of some of the most famous citizens of his time including Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee.
https://www.battlefields.org/learn/biographies/mathew-brady

The Civil War as Photographed by Mathew Brady~
http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/brady-photos/

“Mathew Brady: Portraits of a Nation” by Robert Wilson~
https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/mathew-brady-9781620402030/
Portraits by Mathew Brady~ http://www.mathewbrady.com/portraits.htm


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