Pride Month~ June 30

 

Zanele Muholi (Born 1972)
South African artist and self-described visual activist
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/zanele-muholi

Bester V (Mayotte) / 2015 / Silver Gelatin Print / Paper: 23 3/4″x20″

 

 

 

 

Kehinde Wiley (Born 1977)
Applies the visual vocabulary of heroic portraits to contemporary subjects
http://akkad-design.com/KehindeWiley/Gallery/index_Bio.html

Three Graces / 2005 / Oil and enamel on canvas / 72″x96″

Pride Month~ June 9


Grant Wood (1891-1942)
One of three leaders of the American Regionalist movement
http://archive.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2010/11/07/candid_examination_of_iconic_painter_grant_wood/

Parson Weems’ Fable / 1939 / Oil on canvas / 38 3⁄8” x50 1⁄8”

Hubert Stowitts (1892-1953) Dancer, film actor, painter, designer, and metaphysician
http://www.queer-arts.org/archive/jan_98/stowitts/biography.html

Work of Stowitts for “The Fox-God”, an opera in 3 acts / 1939 / Mounted color plate from painting / 15 1/4”x13”

Love & War~ May 25

Charles & Ray Eames

(Learn more by clicking on hyperlinks)

Charles was a designer with an eye for form. Ray was an artist with an eye for color. They complemented each other on projects like coat hangers, films, their namesake chairs, and large architectural projects. Through four decades of creative work, they revolutionized design and created an indelible mark on American History. The duo was not without faults, but the pair proved to be inseparable and inspirational. They were the Eameses.

The Eames studio—part workshop, part circus— was a partnership of two free spirits: one, an architecture school dropout who never got his license; the other, a painter trained by Hans Hofmann who used objects or any other surface as her canvases. They shunned the term “artist” as pompous.

Charles and Ray Eames arrived in Los Angeles in 1941, a year after they met at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. Charles was married to his first wife, Catherine at the time, but Ray began assisting him and Eero Saarinen in their designs for the Museum of Modern Art’s Organic Design in Home Furnishings Competition, and soon he divorced Catherine and married Ray.

There is always a karmic danger in marrying someone with whom you committed adultery. The women at the company almost uniformly describe him as charismatic. At one point (that we know of), Charles was looking to leave Ray, and was only stopped because the woman confesses, she couldn’t do that to Ray. (, Pasadena Art & Science Beat, https://ageofthegeek.org/2011/11/23/eames-the-architect-and-the-painter-or-why-feminism-matters/ )

Their partnership, which obliterated the distinctions between private and professional lives, inspired numerous contemporary working marriages…Charles and Ray, architect and artist, wanted to do everything — disciplinary boundaries meant nothing to them — and, by and large, succeeded.

The Work of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention
AD Classics: Eames House / Charles and Ray Eames
The Love Letters of Charles & Ray Eames

March 27~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Helen Frankenthaler (1928-2011),
American pivotal in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Color Field painting     http://www.frankenthalerfoundation.org/helen/biography

Nature Abhors a Vacuum / 1973 / Acrylic on canvas / 103 1/2”x112 1/2”

Yayoi Kusama (Born 1929), Japanese self-described “obsessional artist” employs painting, sculpture, performance art, and installation     https://www.britannica.com/biography/Yayoi-Kusama

Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity / 2009 / Wood, metal, glass mirrors, plastic, acrylic paint, LED lighting system, and water / 163 1/2”x163 1/2”x113 1/4”

Artist Birthday Quiz for 1/29~

This painter played an important role in the formative years of the New York School, but did not achieve recognition for his own work until late in his career.

Despite 27 years of  clashes with Disney, this artist and children’s book author rose through the ranks to become both illustrator and screenwriter before finally leaving.

Answers here~ https://schristywolfe.com/2015/01/29/january-29/

Artist Birthday Quiz for 1/7~

Which French Naturalist painter and printmaker was elected in November 1900 to the Fine Arts Academy of the French Institute, one of the youngest painters to receive this honor?

Which American artist became a rising star in the 1980s for his graphite and charcoal series “Men in the Cities”, which depicted smartly dressed men and women flailing in awkward postures?

Answers here~ https://schristywolfe.com/2016/01/07/january-7/

Edward Ruscha: Born December 16, 1937


Stopping off in New York City on his way back
[from Europe], he paid a call on Leo Castelli, whose gallery showed Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Frank Stella. No introduction, no calling beforehand—he just walked in with the Paris paintings under his arm. Castelli, all European charm and suavity, said that Ruscha’s work looked interesting, and told him to stay in touch. Ruscha stayed in touch for twelve years, visiting the gallery on his occasional trips to New York, and in 1973 Castelli became his New York dealer. Ruscha never seriously considered moving East. “That was too big a decision, and too big a jump,” he told me. “It just didn’t feel like it was meant to be.” He wanted to live in Los Angeles, and by the time he returned from Europe he knew that the only thing he could possibly be was an artist. “I could see I was just born for the job, born to watch paint dry,” he said.
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/07/01/ed-ruschas-l-a

Biography~ http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artists/edward-ruscha-1882
Where is Rocky II?~ https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/documentary-mysterious-ed-ruscha-work-gets-north-american-premiere-at-lacma-962057
Edward Ruscha’s Deadpan Artistry~ http://broadstreetonline.org/2015/01/edward-ruschas-deadpan-artistry/

 

Mary Blair: Born October 21, 1911

Her vibrant colors and stylized designs pervade Disney animated films from 1943 to 1953 (such as THE THREE CABALLEROS, CINDERELLA, ALICE IN WONDERLAND AND PETER PAN). A prolific artist, during the 1950’s and 60’s she brought eye-appealing flair to children’s books (I CAN FLY), advertisements, theatrical set designs, and large-scale theme park murals and attractions (such as Disneyland’s IT’S A SMALL WORLD).

Though much of her art veers away from naturalism toward abstraction, she was one of Walt Disney’s favorite artists; he personally responded to her use of color, naïve graphics, and the storytelling aspect in her pictures…
About Mary~ http://magicofmaryblair.com/about-mary.htm

Biography~ http://www.californiawatercolor.com/pages/mary-blair-biography
MARY BLAIR (1911-1978)~ http://www.sullivangoss.com/mary_Blair/