November 26~ Artists at their Easels

Self-Portrait  by  James A. Porter

c.1935 / Oil paint on linen / 14”x12” / National Museum of African American History & Culture

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The Painter and his Family  by  André Derain

c.1939 / Oil paint on canvas / 69 1/2”x48 3/4” / Tate Gallery

Hispanic Artists~September 27

Archaeological Find #22: The Aftermath  by  Raphael Montañez Ortiz

1962 / Destroyed sofa (wood, cotton, vegetable fiber, wire, and glue) on wood backing
El Museo del Barrio, New York

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La Ascensión (The Ascension)  by  Graciela Iturbide

1984 / Gelatin silver photograph / 12”x8” / Various, incl. Brooklyn Museum

Hispanic Artists~September 26

Constructive Cathedral  by  Joaquín Torres-García

1931 / Oil on canvas / 27 3/4”x23” / National Museum of Fine Arts of Argentina, Buenos Aires
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Medea  by  Rodolfo Abularach

1974 / Oil on canvas / 24”x30” / Museum of Republic Bank Art Collection, Bogota, Colombia

Hispanic Artists~September 15

Paisaje de Cornellá (Cornellá Landscape) by Rafael Barradas

1926 / Oil on canvas / 22”x30” / Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía
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Self-Portrait with Cigarette by Celeste Woss y Gil

c.1940 / Oil on canvas / 19”x15” / Centro Cultural Eduardo León Jimenes,
Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

National Hispanic Heritage Month 2018: Sept. 15 to Oct. 15

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402. The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.
https://hispanicheritagemonth.gov/about/

Links to Selected Exhibits and Collections here~ https://www.hispanicheritagemonth.gov/exhibits-and-collections/

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For more information on the artists featured in the slide show:

Judith F. Baca~ http://www.artnews.com/2017/04/19/concrete-history-chicana-muralist-judith-f-baca-goes-from-the-great-wall-to-the-museum-wall/
Daniel Martin Diaz~ http://danielmartindiaz.com/about.php
Carmen Lomas Garza~ https://americanart.si.edu/artist/carmen-lomas-garza-6783
Ester Hernandez~ http://artinprint.org/article/ester-hernandez-sun-mad/
Yolanda Lopez~ https://www.library.ucsb.edu/special-collections/cema/lopez_y
Soraida Martinez~ https://theartguide.com/artists/soraida-martinez
Manuel Neri~ https://anderson.stanford.edu/programs-exhibitions/manuel-neri-assertion-of-the-figure/
Royal Chicano Air Force~ http://www.galeriadelaraza.org/eng/exhibits2/archive/artists.php?op=view&id=3&media=info
Richard Serra~ https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/richard-serra
Patssi Valdez~ https://americanart.si.edu/artist/patssi-valdez-7289
Emigdio Vasquez~ https://www.library.ucsb.edu/special-collections/cema/vasquez_brochure
Los Four~ https://latinomurals.wordpress.com/2014/05/27/losfour/

March 29~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Judy Chicago (Born 1939)
American feminist artist, art educator, and writer known for large collaborative art installations
https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/chicago-judy

Female Rejection Drawing from the Rejection Quintet / 1974 / Colored pencil and graphite on paper / 40”x30”

 

Carrie Mae Weems (Born 1953)
African-American photographer, performance artist, activist, filmmaker, and videographer
http://carriemaeweems.net/bio.html

Untitled (Kitchen Table Series) / 1990 / Gelatin silver print / 27 1/4”x27”

George Washington Carver: c.1864 – January 5, 1943

Probably one of the most recognized names in agricultural research, George Washington Carver (c.1865-1943) overcame numerous obstacles to achieve a graduate education and gain international fame as an educator, inventor, and scientist. http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1064

Born a slave, [Carver] is one of the most historically prominent African American scientists. Carver was a pioneer as an agriculturalist and botanist by introducing methods of soil conservation for farmers, inventing hundreds of by-products from peanuts, pecans, sweet potatoes, and soybeans, and practicing “zero waste” sustainability. Scholars have recognized Carver’s talent as a painter and his ability to develop paints and dyes from various natural sources; however, there is very little scholarship documenting his work as a textile artist. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1922&context=tsaconf

Throughout Carver’s life, he balanced two interests and talents that may seem at odds – the creative arts and the natural sciences. Skills of observation, experimentation, replication, and communication applied to both art and science, making Carver as comfortable in the sciences as in the arts. https://www.thehenryford.org/explore/stories-of-innovation/what-if/george-washington-carver


In the late 1880s, [Carver] made his way to Winterset, Iowa, where a white couple encouraged him to apply to Simpson College in Indianola, Iowa. The only African American student, Carver enrolled in Simpson in September 1890 as an art major. His art teacher recognized his considerable talents, but she was concerned that as a black man, he would have difficulties finding work as a professional artist. After Carver showed her some plants he had hybridized, she suggested that he transfer to Iowa State College of Agricultural and Mechanic Arts (now Iowa State University), in Ames, Iowa, where her father, J. L. Budd, taught horticulture. http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1064

Holdings at the G.W. Carver National Monument and Tuskegee Institute National Historic indicate that Carver was proficient in textile techniques such as embroidery, weaving, crocheting, knitting and basketry. According to a document written by the National Park Service Carver created, “embroideries on burlap, ornaments made of chicken feathers, seed and colored peanut necklaces, woven textiles” (p. 24) and that “He was an honorary member of the Royal Society of Arts in London, England”. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1922&context=tsaconf

What spare time he salvaged from his hectic schedule usually went for the pursuit of loves Carver had sacrificed, like botany and art. He found time to crochet, knit, and do needlework. He found these activities satisfactory and they enabled him to produce useful items for friends. He had great appreciation for the world around him, in particular, the materials found in nature. He dyed many of his own threads and fibers with natural dyes made from local walnut, mulberry, and ochre clay.

He became a scientist, a teacher, a speaker, and more, but he never entirely let go of his art. Rather he brought it to his other pursuits, and at times even let it guide them. Carver taught art classes at Tuskegee in addition to his regular roster of courses. He also allowed his artistic talents to improve his scientific work. He drew diagrams with the fine pen of an illustrator, collected specimens with the attention of a painter and crossbred plants with profound creativity. Through out his life he maintained the soul of an artist and continued to paint. Carver was driven by science, but art remained his passion. https://www.nps.gov/gwca/learn/education/upload/carver-the-artist-curriculum.pdf

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