Self Portraits~August 25

Early Works #25: Self-Portrait  by  Faith Ringgold

1965 / Oil on canvas / 50”x40” / Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum

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Reflection with Two Children (Self-Portrait)  by  Lucian Freud

1965 / Oil on canvas / 35 3/4”x35 3/4” / Museo Nacional Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

Love & War~ May 28

In Flanders Field-Where Soldiers Sleep and Poppies Grow / Robert Vonnoh
1890 / Oil on canvas / 58”x104” / The Butler Institute of American Art

In Flanders Fields By John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

“In Flanders Fields” is a poem written by the Canadian army physician and poet John McCrae. He wrote it in early May 1915 in his medical aid station near Essex farm, 2 km to the north of the centre of Ypres. The poem was published on 8 December 1915. John McCrae died on 28 January 1918, while in charge of the Canadian General Hospital in Boulogne. He is buried in Wimereux cemetery (Pas-de-Calais, France).

“In Flanders Field” became popular almost immediately upon its publication. It was translated into other languages and used on billboards advertising Victory Loan Bonds in Canada. The poppy soon became known as the flower of remembrance for the men and women in Britain, France, the United States, and Canada who have died in service of their country.

^^  (Learn more by clicking on hyperlinks)  ^^

The Birthplace of “In Flanders Fields”
How the poppy became the symbol of sacrifice
A Wall Of Poppies On The National Mall Honors Fallen Soldiers
Dedicate a digital poppy online:

Anna Sewell: Born March 30, 1820

sewellWhile in her fifties Sewell first devised the idea to write her own book about horses. Initially intended, as she wrote in her diary, to be an instructional work to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses little did she know it would become a best-seller. Bustling Victorian London’s society, transportation and industry was dependent on horse power, but there were also emerging vegetarian and animal anti-cruelty groups. Through the trials and tribulations of Black Beauty we see a cross-section of the working conditions and quality of life for horses.
http://www.online-literature.com/anna-sewell/

Black Beauty is widely credited with helping to change the way horses were cared for. There is little doubt that the book helped hasten the abolishment of the “bearing rein” — a strap used to pull a horse’s head in toward its chest to force the appearance of a noticeable arch of the neck. BlackBeauty(This was a highly desired look in aristocratic society, but it created great pain and difficulty for the horses. The animals could not use their neck and chest muscles to pull weigh properly or to breathe correctly. The unnatural arch weakened the horses and usually led to respiratory problems.) Black Beauty also placed a harsh spotlight on the practice of “docking” or cutting short a horses tail, largely for the sake of appearances — a practice that is still widely debated.
How ‘Black Beauty’ Changed The Way We See Horses
http://www.npr.org/2012/11/02/163971063/how-black-beauty-changed-the-way-we-see-horses

Read Black Beauty online or download the free ebook:
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/271silentmovie

Free downloads of Black Beauty in Mp3 (audiobook) format.
http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/125/black-beauty/

March 18~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Beatrix Potter (1866-1943), English writer, illustrator, natural scientist, and conservationist
https://beatrixpottersociety.org.uk/about-beatrix/

Flammulina Velutipes, or Winter Mushrooms / 1892 / Watercolor / dimensions?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Elizabeth Shippen Green (1871-1954)
American illustrator; first female staff member of Harper’s Weekly
https://americanillustration.org/project/elizabeth-shippen-green/

The Journey / Harper’s Monthly Magazine, December 1903 / Oil on canvas / 40”x28”

Kate Greenaway: Born on March 17, 1846

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K is for Kate…Kate Greenaway

Kate Greenaway, English artist and book illustrator, was born in London on March 17, 1846. She was the daughter of John Greenaway, a well-known draughtsman and engraver on wood and Elizabeth Catherine Jones, a seamstress and children’s clothing designer. Her early education included life drawing and watercolor painting classes at Heatherleys in Chelsea and at the Slade School of Fine Art. She began to exhibit her drawings and watercolors in 1868 at London’s Dudley Gallery, and her first published illustrations appeared in such magazines as Little Folks.

With her father’s connections in the trade she was able to convince Edmund Evans, a well known color printer, to publish her first collection of poetry and drawings, Under the Window, in 1879. He was able to translate all the charm of Greenaway’s idyllic pastoral scenes to paper through a costly process that involved the photographing of her dainty water colors on to wood blocks. Against expert advice Evans published only 20,000 copies which immediately sold out and a second printing of 70,000 was produced.
Read more here: http://www.clevelandart.org/research/in-the-library/collection-in-focus/k-kate…kate-greenaway

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Still more about Kate Greenaway here: http://www.victorianweb.org/victorian/art/illustration/greenaway/index.html and here: http://www.abebooks.com/books/RareBooks/illustration-under-window-medal/Kate-Greenaway.shtml

March 7~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Chiara Varotari (1584-c.1663)
Italian Baroque painter, author, and founder of a school for the arts
http://clara.nmwa.org/index.php?g=entity_detail&entity_id=18042

Portrait of a Lady, probably Pantasilea Dotto Capodilista / c.1630 / Oil on canvas / 79”x46”

 

 

Fede Galizia (c.1574-c.1630)
Italian printmaker, painter, and a pioneer of the still life genre
https://www.encyclopedia.com/women/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/galizia-fede-1578-1630

Cherries in a Silver Compote / 1610 / Oil on Panel / 11”x16.5”

March 1~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

 

Illuminations in “Scivias” Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179)
German abbess, writer, composer, mystic, and perhaps artist; it is unclear how involved she was in the illustrations
https://www.wikiart.org/en/hildegard-of-bingen

Das Weltall (The Universe) / c.1165 / Manuscript illumination from “Scivias” by Hildegard of Bingen

 

 

 

 

 

Herrad von Landsberg (c.1130-1195)
Alsatian abbess, artist, author, poet, composer, and educator
https://www.wikiart.org/en/herrad-of-landsberg

Hell / c.1180 / Colored pen and ink drawing on paper, original no longer available

February 22~ African-American visual artists

Barbara Chase-Riboud (Born 1939)
African-American visual artist, novelist, and poet
https://tyler.temple.edu/alumni/barbara-chase-riboud

Malcolm X #3 / 1969 / Polished bronze, rayon, and cotton / 8’ 6 1/2”x3’ 1”x2’ 8”

 

 

Purvis Young (1943-2010)
African-American artist blending painting/drawing/collage
http://www.purvisyounggallery.net/

Untitled / 1985-1999 / Paint on wood / 36”x47 1/4”x1”

February 21~ African-American visual artists


Roland L. Freeman (Born 1936)
African-American photographer, teacher, and documenter of Southern folk culture
http://www.mastersoftraditionalarts.org/artists/105

Bikers Take a Break / 1973, printed 1982 / Gelatin silver print / 11”x13 7/8”

Edythe (Edy) Boone (Born 1938)
African-American muralist, counselor, and art teacher
http://www.berkeleyside.com/2012/06/04/edythe-boone-a-life-spent-inspiring-others-captured-on-film/

Those We Remember / 1995 / Mural / Located in Balmy Alley, San Francisco, California