Born February 4~ Mary Frank

Mary Frank (born February 4, 1933) is an English sculptor, painter, printmaker, draftswoman, and illustrator.
Biography at the Paris Review: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2011/05/26/mary-frank/

Cusp #1 by Mary Frank
2015-17 / Archival pigment print on bamboo paper / 21 1/2″x16 1/2″ / maryfrankartist.com

Mary Frank on Artnet: http://www.artnet.com/artists/mary-frank/

Further reading:
https://www.dcmooregallery.com/artists/mary-frank
https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/frank-mary
https://www.reynoldahouse.org/collections/object/seated-female?display=lightbox

Born January 30~ Maud Hunt Squire

Maud Hunt Squire (January 30, 1873 – October 25, 1954) was an American painter and printmaker.
Biography on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maud_Hunt_Squire

Untitled by Maud Hunt Squire
1929 / Watercolor and graphite on paper / 19″x24 1/4″ / Private collection

Maud Hunt Squire on Artnet: http://www.artnet.com/artists/maud-hunt-squire/

Further reading:
https://maryryangallery.com/artists/maud-hunt-squire/
http://www.papillongallery.com/maude_hunt_squire.html
https://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/about/blog/library-blog-the-illustrated-works-of-ethel-mars-and-maud-hunt-squire/

Born January 19~ Pepi Weixlgärtner-Neutra

Pepi Weixlgärtner-Neutra (January 19, 1886-1981) was an Austrian sculptor, graphic artist, and illustrator.
Biography on Swedish Wikipedia: https://tinyurl.com/y6cwla9a

Little Peasant Girl by Pepi Weixlgärtner-Neutra
c.1930 / Soft-ground etching on paper / 14″x11 4/5″ / The British Museum, London, UK

Pepi Weixlgärtner-Neutra at The British Museum: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/term/BIOG50698

Further reading:
https://oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt6m3nf6v3/
“The Memory Factory: The Forgotten Women Artists of Vienna 1900” on Google Books

January First: Happy New Year!

Jessie Willcox Smith

During the latter part of the 19th century, when printing technology allowed magazines to begin producing full color covers, there began an era known as The Golden Age of Illustration. Probably one of the more famous artists who came from that era was Joseph Christian Leyendecker.

https://schristywolfe.com/2018/01/01/january-first-happy-new-year-3/

Among his 400+ magazine covers are the Baby New Years he painted for The Saturday Evening Post from 1906 to 1943. However, there were lots of other magazines who would devote their New Year covers to Baby New Year — or, at any rate, a baby of some sort.
Not all of the covers shared here are from the Golden Age of Illustration, which is generally described as lasting from the 1880s to the 1920s. But there’s plenty of fine illustrators to be found: Walter Beach Humphrey, Rea Irvin, Jessie Willcox Smith, Vernon Thomas, Charles Twelvetrees, and more.

  1. The Country Gentleman, January 1, 1921 by Walter Beach Humphrey
  2. Good Housekeeping, January 1925, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  3. Child Life, January 1928, by Hazel Frazee
  4. Good Housekeeping, January 1929, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  5. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1930 (could not find this artist)
  6. Good Housekeeping, January 1932, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  7. Collier’s, January 2, 1932 by Charles Twelvetrees
  8. The New Yorker, January 2, 1932, by Rea Irvin
  9. Good Housekeeping, January 1933, by Jessie Willcox Smith
  10. Collier’s, January 6, 1934 by Charles Twelvetrees
  11. Good Housekeeping, January 1935, by Vernon Thomas
  12. Good Housekeeping, January 1936, by Vernon Thomas
  13. Good Housekeeping, January 1937, by Horace C. Gaffron
  14. The Farmer’s Wife, January 1938, by R. James Stuart
  15. The New Yorker, December 1938, by Rea Irvin

Click on pictures to enlarge and scroll through them:

C

National Native American Heritage Month~ November 9

Illustration by Angel DeCora for
Francis La Flesche’s book The Middle Five

1900 / Oil on canvas / No size available / Original held by J. Andrew Darling

[There are five embedded links above]

Paying Tribute to Smith’s First Known Native American Graduate
https://www.smith.edu/newssmith/fall2003/decora.php

National Arts and Humanities Month~ October 3

“Art That Inspires Us to Vote”

Illustrations by Mai Ly DegnanRudy GutierrezAnita KunzTim O’BrienWhitney Sherman, and Yuko Shimizu

One of the most famous American painters and illustrators, Norman Rockwell produced pithy artwork to promote democracy and civic engagement in his time. Now, a museum in Massachusetts dedicated to him asked artists to design “get out the vote” posters for 2020.
Source: The Norman Rockwell Museum wants you to vote, and recruited top illustrators to inspire you – CNN

“The Unity Project is an art and civics initiative of the Norman Rockwell Museum and contemporary illustrators that is dedicated to an inclusive America in which all voices are heard.
Inspired by the rich and continuing tradition of American illustration, this project inspires us to consider the integral role that published imagery plays in creating cultural narratives which connect us to our times.”  ~The Unity Project

[There are eight embedded links above]