August 1, 1944~ Warsaw Uprising against the German occupation is launched

Portrait of a Boy in Glasses by Gela Seksztajn

c.1932-1943 / Watercolor on paper / 27 1/2”x19” / Ringelblum Archive

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The work of the painter Gela Seksztajn~
https://onegszabat.org/en/to-bring-out-the-beauty-of-every-child/
Gela Seksztajn was a Polish-Jewish artist and painter. She is known mostly for her paintings hidden within the Ringelblum Archive in the Warsaw Ghetto. Depicting people was her main focus. She also painted still lifes, landscapes, and nudes. It is believed she died during the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. Gela Seksztajn left more than 300 drawings and paintings; most of them can be found in the Jewish Historical Institute, although there are a few in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in DC and one oil painting in the Yad Vashem Art Collection.

Previous August 1 posts:

Self Portraits~August 1

Artist Birthday Quiz for 8/1~

July 12, 1863~ British forces invade Waikato in New Zealand

King Tawhiao Potatau Te Wherowhero by Gottfried Lindauer

c.1885 / Oil on canvas / 29”x25” / Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, New Zealand

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Previous July 12 posts:

Summer~ July 12

Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven: Born July 12, 1874

Oscar Hammerstein II: Born July 12, 1895

Van Cliburn: Born July 12, 1934

Artist Birthday Quiz for 7/12~

July 11, 1916~ German forces launch final attempt to capture Verdun

Verdun by Félix Valloton

1917 / Oil on canvas / 44 4/5”x57 2/5” / Musée de l’Armée, Paris

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Previous July 11 posts:

Summer~ July 11

July 11, 1804: Alexander Hamilton shot in duel by Aaron Burr

James McNeill Whistler (1834–1903)

E. B. White: Born July 11, 1899

Artist Birthday Quiz for 7/11~

March 10, 1945~ Firebombing of Tokyo

The Flames of Kototoi Bridge—Memories of Losing my Family by Kano Teruo

Age at time of raid: 14 / Teruo Kanoh Gallery, japanairraids.org

Previous March 10 posts:

March 10~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

William Etty: Born March 10, 1787

Dame Eva Turner: Born March 10, 1892

David Hare: March 10, 1917-December 21, 1992

Artist Birthday Quiz for 3/10~

Love & War~ May 30

A Taube  by  C.R.W. Nevinson

1916 / Oil on canvas / 25”x30” / Imperial War Museums, UK

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson ARA (13 August 1889 – 7 October 1946) was an English figure and landscape painter, etcher and lithographer, who was one of the most famous war artists of World War I. He is often referred to by his initials C. R. W. Nevinson, and was also known as Richard.

The son of a famous war correspondent father and a suffragette mother, Nevinson was born in London. He attended the Slade School of Art in London and later shared a studio with Modigliani in Paris, where he also studied at the Académie Julian. Nevinson was one of the leading British avant garde artists of the wartime period to depict the devastation of the First World War.

He served in France with the Red Cross and the Royal Army Medical Corps, 1914–16, before being invalided out, and his harsh, steely images of life and death in the trenches received great acclaim when he held a one-man exhibition at the Leicester Galleries, London, in 1916…In 1917 Nevinson returned to France as an Official War Artist, and he was the first to make drawings from the air.

After the war Nevinson concentrated on townscape and genre painting. His autobiography, “Paint and Prejudice”, was published in 1937. He renewed his career as a war artist with the onset on the Second World War but a stroke cut short his war involvement in 1942. He died in 1946.

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Love & War~ May 28

In Flanders Field-Where Soldiers Sleep and Poppies Grow / Robert Vonnoh
1890 / Oil on canvas / 58”x104” / The Butler Institute of American Art

In Flanders Fields By John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

“In Flanders Fields” is a poem written by the Canadian army physician and poet John McCrae. He wrote it in early May 1915 in his medical aid station near Essex farm, 2 km to the north of the centre of Ypres. The poem was published on 8 December 1915. John McCrae died on 28 January 1918, while in charge of the Canadian General Hospital in Boulogne. He is buried in Wimereux cemetery (Pas-de-Calais, France).

“In Flanders Field” became popular almost immediately upon its publication. It was translated into other languages and used on billboards advertising Victory Loan Bonds in Canada. The poppy soon became known as the flower of remembrance for the men and women in Britain, France, the United States, and Canada who have died in service of their country.

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Love & War~ May 26

Dorothea LangeLange

Mules

Biographies:
International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum~ http://www.iphf.org/hall-of-fame/dorothea-lange/
PBS~ http://www.pbs.org/video/2365971488/

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) documented the change on the homefront, especially among ethnic groups and workers uprooted by the war. Three months after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt ordered the relocation of Japanese-Americans into armed camps in the West. Soon after, the War Relocation Authority hired Lange to photograph Japanese neighborhoods, processing centers, and camp facilities.

Lange’s earlier work documenting displaced farm families and migrant by Dorothea Langeworkers during the Great Depression did not prepare her for the disturbing racial and civil rights issues raised by the Japanese internment. Lange quickly found herself at odds with her employer and her subjects’ persecutors, the United States government.

To capture the spirit of the camps, Lange created images that frequently juxtapose signs of human courage and dignity with physical evidence of the indignities of incarceration. Not surprisingly, many of Lange’s photographs were censored by the federal government, itself conflicted by the existence of the camps.

The true impact of Lange’s work was not felt until 1972, when the Whitney Museum incorporated twenty-seven of her photographs into Executive Order 9066, an exhibit about the Japanese internment. New York Times critic A.D. Coleman called Lange’s photographs “documents of such a high order that they convey the feelings of the victims as well as the facts of the crime.”
http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/wcf/wcf0013.html

 

FatherSonShorpy~ http://www.shorpy.com/dorothea-lange-photographs
National Archives~ https://www.archives.gov/news/articles/japanese-internment-75th-anniversary
National Park Service~ https://www.nps.gov/manz/learn/photosmultimedia/dorothea-lange-gallery.htm

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