Pride Month~ June 28


Alison Bechdel (Born 1960) Cartoonist, writer, and graphic memoirist
https://www.macfound.org/fellows/908/

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic / 2006  / Graphic memoir

Patricia Cronin (Born 1963) New York based conceptual visual artist
http://www.connersmith.us.com/artists/patricia-cronin

Memorial to a Marriage / 2012 / Bronze / 17″x26.5″x53″

Pride Month~ June 10

Erté (1892-1990)  Russian-born French artist, illustrator, and designer
http://gayinfluence.blogspot.com/2013/12/erte.html

Masquerade / 1987 / Embossed serigraph with foil stamping on black paper / 28”x40”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Claude Cahun (1894-1954)
Startlingly original and enigmatic photographic images
https://www.britannica.com/biography/Claude-Cahun

Don’t Kiss Me, I’m in Training (Claude Cahun + Marcel Moore) / 1927 / Monochrome print / 4 5/8”x3 1/2”

Love & War~ May 24

Victory Gardens

During World War I, Liberty Gardens (and later, Victory Gardens) grew out of the government’s efforts to encourage home gardening among Americans, both to express their patriotism and to aid the war effort by freeing up food production for soldiers.

As part of the (World War II) effort, the government rationed foods like sugar, butter, milk, cheese, eggs, coffee, meat and canned goods. Labor and transportation shortages made it hard to harvest and move fruits and vegetables to market. So, the government turned to its citizens and encouraged them to plant “Victory Gardens.” They wanted individuals to provide their own fruits and vegetables.

Americans were encouraged to grow their own to ensure everyone at home had enough to eat…There were 20 million gardens everywhere from rooftops and empty lots to backyards and schoolyards. 40% of produce, which made over 1 million tons, consumed in America was grown in victory gardens. People learned how to can and preserve so the harvests lasted all year.

(Learn more by clicking on hyperlinks)

 

Love & War~ May 22

Sir Winston Churchill by Ernest Hamlin Baker

1949 / Gouache, ink and graphite pencil on paperboard / 11 3/4”x10 1/2″
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Ernest Baker, born in 1889 in Rhode Island, was a self-taught illustrator. Most of his works were covers for Time magazine, although he was responsible for eleven covers for Fortune magazine between 1929 and 1941.

Beginning in 1939, Baker produced over 300 covers for Time during his seventeen-year tenure with the magazine. He was described by Time publisher, Ralph Ingersoll, as an artist who could do anything.
http://www.askart.com/artist_bio/Ernest_Hamlin_Baker/28830/Ernest_Hamlin_Baker.aspx

In December of 1949, Winston Churchill was chosen by Time magazine as the “Man of the Half-Century”, celebrated in a 16-page supplement which was contained in the January 2nd issue of 1950. Baker did the cover illustration for that issue.

Describing Mr Churchill as “the man of the half -century,” Time magazine says: “No man’s history can sum up the dreadful, wonderful years 1900-50. Mr Churchill’s story comes closest …. Sometimes wrong, often right, he fought his way toward the heart of every storm.”
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/22801530

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Keith Haring: May 4, 1958 – February 16, 1990

The Misty Miss Christy

ArtnetNews

Renowned street artist Keith Haring…was born on May 4, 1958, in Pennsylvania, and died in New York in 1990. His eponymous foundation was established a year before his death, and provides grants to those affected by AIDS.
https://news.artnet.com/people/keith-haring-birthday-2016-485381

Keith Haring was born and grew up in Reading, Pennsylvania with his parents and three younger sisters. His father, Allen Haring, was a cartoonist who may have been an inspiration for him to pursue his artistic talents and certainly influenced his son’s work. Haring entered the Ivy School of Professional Art in Pittsburg at age 17 and studied there for two years. He then tired of the commercial art genre and went on to study fine arts in New York City. Here at the School of Visual Arts he was inspired by graffiti art for the first time…http://www.stencilrevolution.com/profiles/keith-haring/

DrawingWhen not torn or cut from their locations by admirers, they would eventually…

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March 19~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Evelyn Beatrice Longman Batchelder (1874-1954)
First woman sculptor to be elected a full member of the National Academy of Design
http://cwhf.org/inductees/arts-humanities/evelyn-longman-batchelder

Industry (aka The Craftsman) / 1931 / Bronze / A.I. Prince Technical HS, Hartford, CT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Violet Oakley (1874-1961)
First American woman to receive a public mural commission
https://hyperallergic.com/405626/a-grand-vision-violet-oakley-and-the-american-renaissance-woodmere-museum-2017/

Mrs. Charles Stewart Wurts IV / 1946 / Charcoal, sanguine, & white chalk on gray paper / 24 3/8”x18 3/8″