October 11, 1987~ AIDS Memorial Quilt displayed for the first time in DC

NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt on the National Mall,
photographed by Mark Thiessen in 1996

Fabric, decorative objects, and personal belongings / Panels measuring 3′ by 6′ assembled into larger
12′ by 12′ blocks / Quilt is housed at NAMES Project Foundation headquarters, Atlanta, Georgia

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Previous October 11 posts:

Autumn~ October 11

Artist Birthday Quiz for 10/11~

The September 11 Quilt Project

We Watched  by Robin Schwalb

72”x36” / Cotton fabrics, stenciled, photo silk-screened. Hand and machine pieced, hand appliquéd, hand quilted
National September 11 Memorial Museum, NYC

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East Village resident Drunell Levinson…announced the September 11 Quilts Memorial project on a website she created especially for that purpose. Calling on volunteers to submit 3’x 6’ or 3’x 3’ quilt panels, she left the choice of materials and the interpretation to the individual artists…By September 10, 2002, the project consisted of 94 unique quilts accompanied by artists’ statements, photographs, memorabilia, emails, and a dedicated website. ~https://www.911memorial.org/tribute/the-september-11-quilt-project

Photographs are from “September 11 Quilts”
See more at https://www.september11quilts.org/index.html

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Previous September 11 posts:

Hispanic Artists~September 11

“Capturing a City’s Emotion in the Days After 9/11”

September 11: 9/11

Artist Birthday Quiz for 9/11~

December 10~ Animals in Art

Mounted ruler (so-called Horseman) / Edo peoples, Benin kingdom, Nigeria

16th century / Copper alloy / 18”x11” / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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Puppy Playing with a Pheasant Feather / Attributed to Yi Am

16th century / 12.25”x17.25” / Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk / Philadelphia Museum of Art

 

Autumn~ October 7

Autumn from the series “The Four Seasons”  by  David Teniers the Younger

c.1644 / Oil on copper / 8 3/4”x6 2/5” / National Gallery, London

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Pichhwai for the Festival of Cows (Gopashtami) in Late Autumn

Late 18th century / Painted and printed gold & silver leaf and opaque watercolor on indigo-dyed cotton
97 5/8”x103 1/8” / Metropolitan Museum of Art

Self Portraits~August 29

Untitled (Self-portrait from Kitchen Table series)  by  Carrie Mae Weems

1990 / Gelatin silver print / 28.3”x28.3” / Various

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Self Portrait in a Yellow Waistcoat
by  Desmond Haughton

1993 / Oil on canvas / 32”x18”
/ Royal Holloway, University of London

Love & War~ May 25

Charles & Ray Eames

(Learn more by clicking on hyperlinks embedded in text)

Charles was a designer with an eye for form. Ray was an artist with an eye for color. They complemented each other on projects like coat hangers, films, their namesake chairs, and large architectural projects. Through four decades of creative work, they revolutionized design and created an indelible mark on American History. The duo was not without faults, but the pair proved to be inseparable and inspirational. They were the Eameses.

The Eames studio—part workshop, part circus— was a partnership of two free spirits: one, an architecture school dropout who never got his license; the other, a painter trained by Hans Hofmann who used objects or any other surface as her canvases. They shunned the term “artist” as pompous.

Charles and Ray Eames arrived in Los Angeles in 1941, a year after they met at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. Charles was married to his first wife, Catherine at the time, but Ray began assisting him and Eero Saarinen in their designs for the Museum of Modern Art’s Organic Design in Home Furnishings Competition, and soon he divorced Catherine and married Ray.

Their partnership, which obliterated the distinctions between private and professional lives, inspired numerous contemporary working marriages…Charles and Ray, architect and artist, wanted to do everything — disciplinary boundaries meant nothing to them — and, by and large, succeeded.

The Work of Charles and Ray Eames: A Legacy of Invention
AD Classics: Eames House / Charles and Ray Eames
The Love Letters of Charles & Ray Eames

March 30~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Chakaia Booker (Born 1953)
African-American sculptor best known for her work using tires as a medium
https://nmwa.org/explore/artist-profiles/chakaia-booker

Urban Butterfly / 2001 / Rubber tires / 57”x53”

 

Kiki Smith (Born 1954)
German-born American artist’s work includes sculpture, printmaking, photography, drawing, and textiles
https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/kiki-smith

Lilith / 1994 / Bronze with glass eyes / 31 1/2”x27”x17 1/2”

March 26~ Women’s History Month in visual arts

Leonora Carrington (1917-2011), British-born Mexican Surrealist painter, artist, and writer
https://www.britannica.com/biography/Leonora-Carrington

The Pomps of the Subsoil / 1947 / Oil on canvas / 23”x37”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clara Ledesma (1924-1999)
Dominican-born artist and gallery owner created paintings, watercolors, and drawings
https://dominicancult.blogspot.com/2013/07/clara-ledesma-dominican-artist.html

Mujer y pájaro rojo (Woman with the red bird) / 1982 / Oil on canvas / 18”x24″