Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

The modern world was born on a printing press. Once essential to communication, the 500-year-old process is now in danger of being lost as its caretakers age. From self-proclaimed basement hoarders to the famed Hatch Show Print, Pressing On: The Letterpress Film explores the question: why has letterpress survived in a digital age?

Worlds of each character emerge as unusual narratives—joyful, mournful, reflective and visionary—are punctuated with on-screen visual poetry, every shot meticulously composed. Captivating personalities blend with wood, metal and type as young printers strive to save this historic process in a film created for the designer, type nerd, historian and collector in us all.

 

via Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

http://www.printmag.com/design-inspiration/the-letterpress-journals-guardians-of-the-craft/

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html

Apollo 11 Image Gallery~ http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/apollo.html

Moon Light by Edvard Munch
1895 / Oil on canvas / 36 3/5”x43 1/3” / National Museum, Oslo, Norway

The Moon in paintings and art~ http://www.popastro.com/moonwatch/moon_guide/art3.php
Moon in Painting~ http://www.artistsandart.org/2009/07/moon-in-painting.html
Moon Paintings of China and Japan~ https://owlcation.com/humanities/moon-paintings

Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre: Born November 18, 1787

LJDLouis Jacques Mande Daguerre was born near Paris, France in 1787. The illusionistic painter Pierre Prevost asked him to join his team of panorama-painting artists when he was just twenty years old. Daguerre soon after became an assistant stage designer for a theater. He was a gifted illusionist in terms of his ability to design sets that dazzled his audiences. An artist who wanted his work to be as real as possible, Daguerre created amazingly life-like scenes right in the theater. These designs, which were able to simulate the passage of day into night, changes in weather, and even give viewers the feel of motion, Daguerre later coined as “dioramas,” or “dramas of light.” By 1825, Daguerre was a successful creator, proprietor, and promoter of a successful illusionistic theater in Paris that specialized in these dioramas.  https://www.fi.edu/history-daguerreotype

Daguerre had been searching since the mid-1820s for a means to capture the fleeting images he saw in his camera obscura, a draftsman’s aid consisting of a wood box with a lens at one end that threw an image onto a frosted sheet of glass at the other. In 1829, he had formed a partnership with Nicéphore Niépce, who had been working on the same problem—how to make a permanent image using light and chemistry—and who had achieved primitive but real results as early as 1826. By the time Niépce died in 1833, the partners had yet to come up with a practical, reliable process.
http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/dagu/hd_dagu.htm

Niépce died in 1833 before practical success was achieved. But Daguerre had learned important things StillLifethrough the partnership, and by 1837 had worked out a solution to the puzzle. In brief, his method consisted of treating silver-plated copper sheets with iodine to make them sensitive to light, then exposing them in a camera and “developing” the images with warm mercury vapor. On the basis of its novelty, and difference from the pewter-and-resin based systems developed by Niépce, Daguerre claimed the invention as his own by naming it “The Daguerreotype.”
http://www.daguerre.org/?page=DagFAQ

Daguerreotype

The Diorama: 19th century entertainment~

Daguerre’s Sole Extant Diorama, Recently Restored~

Rudolph Valentino: Born May 6, 1895

While in New York during the spring of 1923, Rudolph Valentino paid a visit to the Brunswick studios and recorded two songs. El Relicario in Spanish and The Kashmiri Song in English. According to legend, Valentino recorded these songs for his new bride, Natacha Rambova since they had recently wed after a few very tense years of legal difficulties concerning Valentino’s divorce from Jean Acker.
It was reported that after he heard his voice, he quipped “There goes my opera career!
https://www.popsike.com/19231926-Rudolph-Valentino-SingsKashmiri-Love-SongEl-Relicario-78rpm-Record/200783413331.html