The September 11 Quilt Project

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East Village resident Drunell Levinson…announced the September 11 Quilts Memorial project on a website she created especially for that purpose. Calling on volunteers to submit 3’x 6’ or 3’x 3’ quilt panels, she left the choice of materials and the interpretation to the individual artists. Levinson separated her work into two parallel activities: The first was to raise awareness of the project, solicit volunteers and organize public exhibitions; the second was to make a documentary of the participants’ experiences of the September 11th 2001 event, and to explore how these experiences motivated them to create art. By September 10, 2002, the project consisted of 94 unique quilts accompanied by artists’ statements, photographs, memorabilia, emails, and a dedicated website.

Over the next two years, the quilts were displayed as an ensemble in fourteen exhibitions across the United States, as well as in a special presentation in Japan. In addition, Levinson created a 20-minute documentary video entitled “September 11 Quilts: Mending a Diverse Community of Artists.” The September 11 Memorial Exhibition quilts, supporting materials, and documentary were officially donated to the National September 11 Memorial Museum, forming an important addition to the Museum’s growing collection of art made in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
https://www.911memorial.org/tribute/the-september-11-quilt-project

Photographs are from “September 11 Quilts”
See more at https://www.september11quilts.org/index.html

Harris Glenn Milstead: Born October 19, 1945

“We Talk to John Waters and Pat Moran About Divine’s 70th Birthday”  (2015)
His friends remember the legendary drag queenIMG_4196

Milstead met maverick film director & good friend, John Waters, at high school in Baltimore, and the two combined to star in and direct several ultra low budget, taboo breaking cult films of the early 1970s. Their first efforts included Roman Candles (1966), Eat Your Makeup (1968) and Mondo Trasho (1969)….however, their most infamous work together was the amazing Pink Flamingos (1972), in which Divine starred as “Babs Johnson”, the “filthiest person alive” living in a pink trailer with her egg-eating grandmother, chicken-loving son and voyeuristic daughter.
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001145/bio

Remembering legendary drag queen, Divine in photos
11 Throwback Photos Of Divine

“Capturing a City’s Emotion in the Days After 9/11”

nyt

By James Estrin Sep. 7, 2016
Nina Berman photographed the aftermath of the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Later she put some of those images together in diptychs and triptychs.
Ms. Berman lives in New York and is a member of the photographer-owned photo agency Noor. She spoke with James Estrin about her post-Sept. 11 work as well as her projects “Purple Hearts — Back From Iraq” (Trolley, 2004) and “Homeland” (Trolley, 2008). Their conversation has been edited for brevity and clarity.

Read more: Continue reading

August 6, 1945: Enola Gay drops 5-ton bomb over Hiroshima

Composed in 1953 (eight years after the city’s bombing, and coinciding with the end of the American occupation of Japan), its six inner movements were inspired by six paintings by Iri and Toshi Maruki (the score’s original title was The Hiroshima Panels ), framed by a Prelude and Elegy.   http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Name/Masao-Ohki/Composer/148971-1

MARUKI GALLERY FOR THE HIROSHIMA PANELS

Paintings bring Japan’s hellish aftermath into vivid focus

Against Forgetting: Three Generations of Artists in Japan in Dialogue about the Legacies of World War II

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum WesSite~ http://hpmmuseum.jp/?lang=eng

Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

The modern world was born on a printing press. Once essential to communication, the 500-year-old process is now in danger of being lost as its caretakers age. From self-proclaimed basement hoarders to the famed Hatch Show Print, Pressing On: The Letterpress Film explores the question: why has letterpress survived in a digital age?

Worlds of each character emerge as unusual narratives—joyful, mournful, reflective and visionary—are punctuated with on-screen visual poetry, every shot meticulously composed. Captivating personalities blend with wood, metal and type as young printers strive to save this historic process in a film created for the designer, type nerd, historian and collector in us all.

 

via Pressing On: The Letterpress Film

http://www.printmag.com/design-inspiration/the-letterpress-journals-guardians-of-the-craft/

July 20, 1969: One Giant Leap For Mankind

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/apollo11.html

Apollo 11 Image Gallery~ http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/apollo.html

The Moon in paintings and art~ http://www.popastro.com/moonwatch/moon_guide/art3.php
Moon in Painting~ http://www.artistsandart.org/2009/07/moon-in-painting.html
Moon Paintings of China and Japan~ https://owlcation.com/humanities/moon-paintings

July 14, 1916~ The Dada Manifesto

Richard Boix. Da-da (New York Dada Group). 1921. Ink on paper. 11 1/4″ x 14 1/2″ (28.6 x 36.8 cm)
Museum of Modern Art / Katherine S. Dreier Bequest

On July 14, 1916, the poet Hugo Ball proclaimed the manifesto for a new movement. Its name: Dada. Its aim: to “get rid of everything that smacks of journalism, worms, everything nice and right, blinkered, moralistic, europeanised, enervated.” This aim could be achieved simply by saying: “Dada.”

Dada~ Born February 5, 1916            100th anniversary of DADA~

  Max Ernst. Murdering Airplane. 1920. Collage. 2 1/2” x 5 1/2” (6.35 cm × 13.97 cm). Private collection.

Photographer Captures 100 Female Artists In Their Homes And Studios

A great portrait is more than just a frozen reflection of the subject’s appearance. It’s a chance moment, blanketed in natural light, in which the subject’s authentic self is visible in her expression, her stance, her aura. A great portrait blurs the line between a subject and her surroundings, all contributing equally to the overall impression of a singular human being.

Photographer Barbara Yoshida captured not one great portrait, but 100. And to make it all the more glorious, her subjects are all female artists, groundbreaking in their own right.

Source: Photographer Captures 100 Female Artists In Their Homes And Studios | HuffPost