John Lennon: Born October 9, 1940


Topper

NigelHe was born John Winston Lennon on October 9, 1940. Like the other three Beatles, Lennon grew up in a working-class family in Liverpool. His parents, Julia and Fred, separated before he was two (Lennon saw his father only twice in the next 20 years), and Lennon went to live with his mother’s sister Mimi Smith; when Lennon was 17 his mother was killed by a bus. He attendedwCynthia Liverpool’s Dovedale Primary School and later the Quarry Bank High School, which supplied the name for his first band, a skiffle group called the Quarrymen, which he started in 1955.
http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/john-lennon/biography
BedPeaceJohn Lennon didn’t invent rock and roll, nor did he embody it as toweringly as figures like Elvis Presley and Little Richard, but he did more than anyone else to shake it up, move it forward and instill it with a conscience. As the most daring and outspoken of the four Beatles, he helped shape the agenda of the Sixties – socially and politically, no less than musically. As a solo artist, he made musicjandy that alternately disturbed and soothed, provoked and sought community. As a human being, he served as an exemplar of honesty in his art and life.
https://rockhall.com/inductees/john-lennon/bio/

John Lennon’s first Rolling Stone interview~ http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/john-lennon-1970-jann-wenner-rolling-stone-interview-w481395
John Lennon’s final interview~
http://www.openculture.com/2015/03/hear-john-lennons-final-interview-taped-on-the-day-of-his-death.html
Transcript~ http://www.beatlesarchive.net/john-lennons-last-interview-december-8-1980.html

JohnandYokoBottom

Arnold Schönberg: Born September 13, 1874

arnold_schoenbergArnold Schoenberg (1874-1951)
http://www.musicacademyonline.com/composer/biographies.php?bid=83
Born in Vienna on 13 September 1874, into a family that was not particularly musical, Schoenberg was largely self-taught as a musician. An amateur cellist, he demonstrated from early age a particular aptitude for composition. He received rudimentary instruction in harmony and counterpoint from Oskar Adler and studied composition briefly with Alexander Zemlinsky, his eventual brother-in-law. Early in his career, Schoenberg took jobs orchestrating operettas, but most of his life was spent teaching, both privately and at various institutions, and composing…Schoenberg fled the poisonous political atmosphere of Europe in 1933 and spent the remainder of his life primarily in the United States, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1941.gschoenberg
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/arnold-schoenberg-mn0000691043/biography
Arnold Schoenberg’s Many Faces~ http://www.nytimes.com/1995/10/28/style/28iht-arn.t.html

schoenbergArnold Schönberg Center~ http://www.schoenberg.at/index.php/en/

Artistic Parallels between Arnold Schönberg’s Music & Painting~ essay written by Courtney Adams~ http://symposium.music.org/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=2111:artistic-parallels-between-arnold-schoenbergs-music-and-painting-1908-1912&Itemid=124

Henry Purcell: Born September 10, 1659

Purcell wrote only one full opera, a short work supposedly designed for a girls’ school. The tragic story of Dido and Aeneas, with a libretto by Nahum Tate, has a perfection of its own. Dido’s final lament, before she kills herself, follows the model for such compositions established by Monteverdi eighty years before. Other stage works by Purcell are in the hybrid form now known as semi-opera, combining spoken drama and a musical element that in the concert-hall may be performed apart from its wider dramatic context.
Biography~ http://www.fabermusic.com/composers/henry-purcell/biography

BBC artist page for Henry Purcell~ http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/ddea5540-2c7d-4266-8507-b367c2635d35

August 6, 1945: Enola Gay drops 5-ton bomb over Hiroshima

Composed in 1953 (eight years after the city’s bombing, and coinciding with the end of the American occupation of Japan), its six inner movements were inspired by six paintings by Iri and Toshi Maruki (the score’s original title was The Hiroshima Panels ), framed by a Prelude and Elegy.   http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Name/Masao-Ohki/Composer/148971-1

MARUKI GALLERY FOR THE HIROSHIMA PANELS

Paintings bring Japan’s hellish aftermath into vivid focus

Against Forgetting: Three Generations of Artists in Japan in Dialogue about the Legacies of World War II

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum WesSite~ http://hpmmuseum.jp/?lang=eng

Isaac Stern: Born July 21, 1920

stern1Stern’s family moved to the United States and settled in San Francisco when he was one year old. His mother, a professional singer, gave him his first music lessons. He began studying the violin at the San Francisco Conservatory in 1928. In 1932 he became the third immensely talented San Francisco-area boy to train with the San Francisco Symphony concertmaster Louis Persinger (the others were Menuhin and Ruggiero Ricci). However, he considered Naoum Blinder, with whom he studied until the age of 15, his only true teacher. Stern made his debut with the San Francisco Symphony on February 18, 1936, with Pierre Monteux conducting the Third Concerto by Saint-Saëns.
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/isaac-stern-mn0000965898/biography

However, Stern was to become as famous internationally for his contribution to public causes as he was Stern2for his concert performances and recordings. His social contributions took many forms: his most noted involvement as a cultural activist was his pivotal role in the 1960 salvation of Carnegie Hall, then facing demolition. Elected president of the Carnegie Hall Corporation, he guided the affairs of the edifice he called “our country’s affirmation of the human spirit” (Stern and Potok, p. 141) until the end of his life. He was chairman of the board of the America-Israel Cultural Foundation and founder and chairman of the Stern3Jerusalem Music Center, and in the United States he campaigned for and became a founding member of the National Endowment for the Arts in 1964. In 1975 he received the first Albert Schweitzer Award for “a life’s work dedicated to music and devoted to humanity” and two years later was made a member of the French Légion d’Honneur.
http://www.anb.org/articles/18/18-03785.html

Obituary, New York Times~ http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/23/nyregion/violinist-isaac-stern-dies-at-81-led-efforts-to-save-carnegie-hall.html

July 14, 1916~ The Dada Manifesto

Richard Boix. Da-da (New York Dada Group). 1921. Ink on paper. 11 1/4″ x 14 1/2″ (28.6 x 36.8 cm)
Museum of Modern Art / Katherine S. Dreier Bequest

On July 14, 1916, the poet Hugo Ball proclaimed the manifesto for a new movement. Its name: Dada. Its aim: to “get rid of everything that smacks of journalism, worms, everything nice and right, blinkered, moralistic, europeanised, enervated.” This aim could be achieved simply by saying: “Dada.”

Dada~ Born February 5, 1916            100th anniversary of DADA~

  Max Ernst. Murdering Airplane. 1920. Collage. 2 1/2” x 5 1/2” (6.35 cm × 13.97 cm). Private collection.