Hispanic Artists~September 27

Archaeological Find #22: The Aftermath  by  Raphael Montañez Ortiz

1962 / Destroyed sofa (wood, cotton, vegetable fiber, wire, and glue) on wood backing
El Museo del Barrio, New York

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La Ascensión (The Ascension)  by  Graciela Iturbide

1984 / Gelatin silver photograph / 12”x8” / Various, incl. Brooklyn Museum

Viktor Hartmann: Born May 5, 1834

In 1873 at the age of thirty-nine, Viktor Alexandrovich Hartmann, Russian architect and painter, died from an aneurysm. He was at the forefront of the Russian Revival, friend of and inspiration to many contemporaries in the field of architecture, art and music. Shortly after his death, Vladimir Vasilievich Stasov, helped to arrange an exhibition of Hartmann’s work.

Mussorgsky poured out his feeling about his friend’s death in a letter to Stassov. who shared the Russian nationalist tendencies of Hartmann and Mussorgsky and had brought the two men together in the first place.

Mussorgsky’s piano suite was not published until after his death, is dedicated to Stassov. Stassov, with whom Mussorgsky had discussed the suite as he composed it, explained in the first edition of the Pictures at an Exhibition: “The composer here portrays himself walking now right, now left, now as an idle person, now urged to go near a picture; at times his joyous appearance is dampened, he thinks in sadness of his dead friend. …”
http://korschmin.com/pictures-at-an-exhibition/

Sir Georg Solti – Chicago Symphony Orchestra 1980

via Viktor Hartmann: Born May 5, 1834

Marian Anderson: Born February 27, 1897

Contralto Marian Anderson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A variety of sources suggested February 17, 1902, as her birthdate; however, Anderson’s birth certificate, released by her family after her death, listed the date as February 27, 1897. Her father was an ice and coal salesman, and her mother was a former teacher.

Although Anderson had early showed an interest in the violin, she eventually focused on singing. The Black community, recognizing her talent, gave her financial and moral support. She also gained the notice of tenor Roland Hayes, who provided guidance in her developing career.
http://www.afrovoices.com/anderson.html

February 25~ African-American visual artists

Terry Adkins (1953-2014)
African-American artist known for his fusion of sculpture, performance, and music
https://www.levygorvy.com/artist/terry-adkins/

Matinée (Installation view) / 2007-2013 / Bronze, steel, hangers, burnt cork / 74”x62”

 

 

Marilyn Nance (Born 1953)
African-American new media artist, photographer and storyteller
https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/coll/womphotoj/nanceessay.html

Three Placards, New York City / 1986 / Gelatin silver print / 5 7/8”x8 3/4”

 

Nancy Wilson: Born February 20, 1937

Nancy Wilson’s musical style is so diverse that it is hard to classify. Over the years her repertoire has included pop style ballads, jazz and blues, show tunes and well known standards. Critics have described her as “a jazz singer,” “a blues singer,” “a pop singer,” and “a cabaret singer.” Still others have referred to her as “a storyteller,” “a professor emeritus of body language,” “a consummate actress,” and “the complete entertainer.” Then who is this song stylist (that’s the descriptive title she prefers) whose voice embodies the nuances of gospel, blues, and jazz? Her colleague and long time friend Joe Williams used to call her “the thrush from Columbus.”
http://musicians.allaboutjazz.com/nancywilson

NPR: “Heifetz and Kreisler: Setting Standards for the Violin”

HeifetzKreisler

Jascha Heifetz and Fritz Kreisler were both born on Feb. 2 — Kreisler in 1875 and Heifetz in 1901. But the two men share more than just a birthday. Music commentator Miles Hoffman joins Renee Montagne to discuss the two famous fiddlers and how they each set new standards for the art of playing the violin.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=7121113