July 15, 1923~ Jazz drummer Philly Joe Jones is born

Philly Joe Jones by Francis Wolff

Date unknown / Black & white photograph shot with twin-lens, square-format Rolleiflex / ©Francis Wolff

[There are three embedded links above]

The Blue Note Photographs of Francis Wolff~
http://si-siris.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-blue-note-photographs-of-francis.html
The Impossibly Cool Album Covers of Blue Note Records: Meet the Creative Team Behind These Iconic Designs~
http://www.openculture.com/2018/11/the-impossibly-cool-album-covers-of-blue-note-records.html
Cool, clear, collected~
http://www.eyemagazine.com/feature/article/cool-clear-collected

Previous July 15 posts:

Summer~ July 15

Artist Birthday Quiz for 7/15~

Nancy Wilson: Born February 20, 1937

Nancy Wilson’s musical style is so diverse that it is hard to classify. Over the years her repertoire has included pop style ballads, jazz and blues, show tunes and well known standards. Critics have described her as “a jazz singer,” “a blues singer,” “a pop singer,” and “a cabaret singer.” Still others have referred to her as “a storyteller,” “a professor emeritus of body language,” “a consummate actress,” and “the complete entertainer.” Then who is this song stylist (that’s the descriptive title she prefers) whose voice embodies the nuances of gospel, blues, and jazz? Her colleague and long time friend Joe Williams used to call her “the thrush from Columbus.”
http://musicians.allaboutjazz.com/nancywilson

Artist Birthday Quiz for 12/9~

What versatile 20th century Dutch graphic designer, illustrator, and fine artist always referred to his posters as “street paintings”?

What American photographer initially took photographs to record images for use in paintings, but came to prefer the camera to the brush?

Answers here~ https://schristywolfe.com/2015/12/09/december-9/

Josephine Baker: Born on June 3, 1906

JBBaker, Josephine (3 June 1906-12 Apr. 1975), dancer, singer, and civil rights activist, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the daughter of Eddie Carson, a musician, and Carrie Macdonald. Her parents parted when Josephine was still an infant, and her mother married Arthur Martin, which has led to some confusion about her maiden name. Very little is known about her childhood, except that she was a witness to the East St. Louis riot in 1917.
Josephine Baker…began her career in “tent shows,” touring musical ensembles that played mostly in the southern states. Her first success was as a comic dancer in a show…Her Broadway debut was in The Chocolate Dandies at the Colonial Theatre in September 1924…
Subsequent appearances in New York City…led to Baker’s engagement as one of the featured performers in La Revue Nègre, an all-black show…La Revue Nègre was destined to become one of the key influences in Parisian theater and visual arts in the late 1920s.
http://www.anb.org/articles/18/18-00048.html

JBfamilyAchievements~ http://www.cmgww.com/stars/baker/about/achievements.html

JBDCSpeech at the March on Washington~ http://www.blackpast.org/1963-josephine-baker-speech-march-washington
FBI files~ http://vault.fbi.gov/josephine-baker

 

Discography~ http://www.discogs.com/artist/378436-Josephine-Baker

Woody Herman: Born May 16, 1913

A fine swing clarinetist, an altoist whose sound was influenced by Johnny Hodges, a good soprano saxophonist, and a spirited blues vocalist, Woody Herman’s greatest significance to jazz was as the leader of a long line of big bands. He always encouraged young talent and, more than practically any bandleader from the swing era, kept his repertoire quite modern. Although Herman was always stuck performing a few of his older hits (he played “Four Brothers” and “Early Autumn” nightly for nearly 40 years), he much preferred to play and create new music.
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/woody-herman-mn0000958076/biography

Ella Fitzgerald: Born April 25, 1917~

Ella Fitzgerald by Al Hirschfeld, 1993. Ink on board. Melvin R. Seiden Collection
of Drawings by Al Hirschfeld, Harvard Theatre Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University

In mid 1936, Ella made her first recording. “Love and Kisses” was released under the Decca label, with moderate success. By this time she was performing with Chick’s band at the prestigious Harlem’s Savoy Ballroom, often referred to as “The World’s Most Famous Ballroom.”

Shortly afterward, Ella began singing a rendition of the song, “(If You Can’t Sing It) You Have to Swing It.” During this time, the era of big swing bands was shifting, and the focus was turning more toward bebop. Ella played with the new style, often using her voice to take on the role of another horn in the band. “You Have to Swing It” was one of the first times she began experimenting with scat singing, and her improvisation and vocalization thrilled fans. Throughout her career, Ella would master scat singing, turning it into a form of art.
Ella Fitzgerald | Official Site~ http://www.ellafitzgerald.com/about/biography


Ella Fitzgerald at 100 (npr)~

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/25/524726767/early-hardship-couldnt-muffle-ella-fitzgeralds-joy

American Masters~
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/ella-fitzgerald-something-to-live-for/590/

21 Dazzling Photos Of Jazz Legend Ella Fitzgerald Over The Years

RARE PHOTO of Ella Fitzgerald Goes On Display at Smithsonian