June 21, 1964~ Civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, & Michael Schwerner brutally murdered

Murder in Mississippi (Southern Justice) by Norman Rockwell

1965 / Oil on canvas / Intended as illustration for Look magazine issue of June 29, 1965;
a preparatory study was published instead / Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA

[There are five embedded links above]

Previous June 21 posts:

Pride Month~ June 21

Al Hirschfeld: Born June 21, 1903

Artist Birthday Quiz for 6/21~

May 8, 1958~ Eisenhower orders federalized National Guard removed from Little Rock

The Little Rock Nine  by  Platon, 2010

From left: Jefferson Thomas, Minnijean Brown-Trickey, Gloria Ray Karlmark, Elizabeth Eckford,
Carlotta Walls LaNier, Terrence Roberts, Thelma Mothershed Wair, Melba Patillo Beals and Ernest Green

Previous May 6 posts:

Love & War~ May 8

Bob Clampett: Born May 8, 1913

Artist Birthday Quiz for 5/8~

April 7, 1940~ Booker T. Washington is first African-American honored on U.S. postage stamp

10 cent Booker T. Washington stamp by USPS; part of Famous Americans series

1940 / Engraving, dark brown ink on paper; adhesive / National Postal Museum Collection, Smithsonian Institution, D.C.

Booker T. Washington by Harris & Ewing, Inc.

Digital image from glass negative of unknown date (between 1905 and 1915) / Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division, D.C.

Previous April 7 posts:

Spring~ April 7

Billie Holiday: April 7, 1915-July 17, 1959

Billie Holiday: Born on April 7, 1915

Artist Birthday Quiz for 4/7~

Jackie Robinson: January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972

robinsonLIFE With Jackie Robinson: Rare and Classic Photos of an American Icon

When Jack Roosevelt Robinson stepped onto Brooklyn’s Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947, he not only changed the face of professional baseball in America. In ways subtle and profound — ways that have been debated, dissected and celebrated in books, films, popular songs, academic circles and casual conversations in the long decades since — he changed the nation itself.

Here, LIFE.com offers a selection of both classic and, in some cases, rare pictures that paint a portrait of a man whose dignity, competitive fire and grace under pressure set him indelibly and inevitably apart from his peers and his rivals.

http://time.com/3813840/life-with-jackie-robinson-rare-and-classic-photos-of-an-american-icon/

Ruby Bridges: Born September 8, 1954


https://www.biography.com/people/ruby-bridges-475426

Ruby Bridges Goes to School:
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/video/ruby-bridges-goes-to-school/

Ruby Bridges Biography:
https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/ruby-bridges

“The Problem We All Live With” by Norman Rockwell
1964 / Oil on canvas / 36”x58” / Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, Massachusetts
The painting was originally published as a centerfold in the January 14, 1964 issue of Look magazine

March 7, 1965: Selma to Montgomery Marches begin

Selma through the camera lens:
https://mistymisschristy.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/barker.jpg

James Barker
These Rare Photos of the Selma March Place You in the Thick of History. James Barker, a photographer from Alaska, shares his memories of documenting the famed event:
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/rare-photos-selma-march-thick-history-180953874/?no-ist

LIFE

Charles Moore, Flip Schulke and Frank Dandridge
How LIFE Magazine Covered the Selma Marches in 1965. Fifty years after nonviolent protesters clashed with Alabama state troopers in Selma:
http://time.com/3720555/selma-bloody-sunday/

smartin

Spider Martin
Photographer Helped Expose Brutality Of Selma’s ‘Bloody Sunday’:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/codeswitch/2015/03/06/390943835/photographer-helped-expose-brutality-of-selmas-bloody-sunday


The Atlantic: “What LBJ Really Said About Selma” [click photo]:

lbj

February 29, 1940: Hattie McDaniel wins an Oscar

The 12th Academy Awards ceremony was held on February 29, 1940, at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, with Bob Hope hosting. Gone With The Wind was nominated for 13 awards and won for Outstanding Production, Directing (Victor Fleming), Actress (Vivien Leigh), Art Direction (Lyle Wheeler), Cinematography HM(Color) (Ernest Haller and Ray Rennahan), and Film Editing (Hal Kern and James Newcom). Sidney Howard posthumously received the Writing (Screenplay) award, and production designer William Cameron Menzies received a special award for “outstanding use of color for the enhancement of dramatic mood in the production of Gone With The Wind.” In the Actress in Supporting Role category, Hattie McDaniel made history becoming the first African American to receive an Academy Award.
http://blog.hrc.utexas.edu/2016/02/26/hattie-mcdaniels-landmark-academy-awards-win/

Oscar’s First Black Winner Accepted Her Honor in a Segregated ‘No Blacks’ Hotel in L.A.~
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/oscars-first-black-winner-accepted-774335
The Curious Case Of A Missing Academy Award~
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=100937570

Marian Anderson: Born February 27, 1897

Contralto Marian Anderson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A variety of sources suggested February 17, 1902, as her birthdate; however, Anderson’s birth certificate, released by her family after her death, listed the date as February 27, 1897. Her father was an ice and coal salesman, and her mother was a former teacher.

Although Anderson had early showed an interest in the violin, she eventually focused on singing. The Black community, recognizing her talent, gave her financial and moral support. She also gained the notice of tenor Roland Hayes, who provided guidance in her developing career.
http://www.afrovoices.com/anderson.html